Authors:
Anita Birinji Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia

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Kristina Pogrmić-Majkić Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 3, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia

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Željko Mihaljev Scientific Veterinary Institute “Novi Sad”, Rumenački put 20, 21113 Novi Sad, Serbia

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Marija Marin Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia

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Dušan Lalošević Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Hajduk Veljkova 3, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia

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Abstract

In this study, we evaluated the cumulative effects of arsenic (III) oxide on the number of mouse offspring over three consecutive generations and monitored changes in levels of the reproductive hormones, oestradiol and progesterone in female mice during the dioestrus phase of the cycle. The control group received water from the mains. In two experimental groups, mice were given drinking water containing dissolved arsenic (III) oxide at concentrations of 10.6 mg L−1 and 106 mg L−1, respectively. These concentrations represent the values converted from a human model to an animal model (mice) thus correspond to the arsenic content of the groundwater in the southern part of the Pannonian Basin, in the province of Vojvodina, in the Banat region, in particular in the town of Zrenjanin. The average number of newborn mice in both experimental groups decreased for three consecutive generations. The total arsenic content of day-old mice did not show significant differences between the experimental groups. Arsenic (III) oxide affected the reproductive hormone levels of female mice at both concentrations.

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  • Aposhian, H. V. and Aposhian, M. M. (2006): Arsenic toxicology: five questions. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 19, 115.

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  • Bashir, S., Sharma, Y., Irshad, M., Gupta, S. D. and Dogra, T. D. (2006b): Arsenic-induced cell death in liver and brain of experimental rats. Basic Clin. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 98, 3843.

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  • Bodwell, J. E., Kingsley, L. A. and Hamilton, J. W. (2004): Arsenic at very low concentrations alters glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene activation but not GR- mediated gene repression: complex dose-response effects are closely correlated with levels of activated GR and require a functional GR DNA binding domain. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 17, 10641076.

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  • Bodwell, J. E., Gosse, J. A., Nomikos, A. P. and Hamilton, J. W. (2006): Arsenic disruption of steroid receptor gene activation: complex dose-response effects are shared by several steroid receptors. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 19, 619629.

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  • Chatterjee, A. and Chatterji, U. (2010): Arsenic abrogates the estrogen-signaling pathway in the rat uterus. Reprod. Biol. Endocrinol. 8, 80.

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  • Commission Directive 2003/40/EC of 16 May 2003 establishing the list, concentration limits and labelling requirements for the constituents of natural mineral waters and the conditions for using ozone-enriched air for the treatment of natural mineral waters and spring waters. OJ L126, 22.5.2003, p. 3439.

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  • Council Directive 98/83/EC of 3 November 1998 on the quality of water intended for human consumption. OJ L 330, 5.12.1998, p. 128.

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  • Erkan, M., Aydin, Y., Yilmaz, B. O. and Yildizbayrak, N. (2021): Chapter 16: arsenic-induced oxidative stress in reproductive systems. In: Patel, V. B., Preedy, V. R. (eds.) Toxicology. Academic Press. pp. 145155.

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  • Hopenhayn, C., Ferreccio, C., Browning, S. R., Huang, B., Peralta, C., Gibb, H. and Hertz-Picciotto, I. (2003): Arsenic exposure from drinking water and birth weight. Epidemiology 14, 593602.

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  • Hughes, M. F. (2002): Arsenic toxicity and potential mechanisms of action. Toxicol. Lett. 133, 116.

  • IARC (2004): Some drinking-water disinfectants and contaminants, including arsenic. IARC Monogr. Eval. Carcinog. Risks Hum. 84, 1477.

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  • Jovanović, D., Jakovljević, B., Rašić-Milutinović, Z., Paunović, K., Peković, G. and Knežević, T. (2011): Arsenic occurrence in drinking water supply systems in ten municipalities in Vojvodina Region, Serbia. Environ. Res. 111, 315318.

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  • Liu, J. and Waalkes, M. P. (2008): Liver is a target of arsenic carcinogenesis. Toxicol. Sci. 105, 2432.

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  • Manimaran, A., Sarkar, S. N. and Sankar, P. (2010): Influence of repeated preexposure to arsenic on acetaminophen-induced oxidative stress in liver of male rats. Food Chem. Toxicol. 48, 605610.

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  • Mazumder, D. G. and Dasgupta, U. B. (2011): Chronic arsenic toxicity: studies in West Bengal, India, Kaohsiung. J. Med. Sci. 27, 360370.

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  • Minatel, B. C., Sage, A. P., Anderson, C., Hubaux, R., Marshall, E. A., Lam, W. L. and Martinez, V. D. (2018): Environmental arsenic exposure: from genetic susceptibility to pathogenesis. Environ. Int. 112, 183197.

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  • Nair, A. B. and Jacob, S. (2016): A simple practice guide for dose conversion between animals and human. J. Basic Clin. Pharm. 7, 2731.

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  • National Research Council of National Academies: Committee for the Update of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals: Institute for Laboratory Animal Research: Division on Earth and Life Studies (NRC) (2011): Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. Eighth Edition. National Academic Press. Washington, DC.

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  • Nesnow, S., Roop, B. C., Lambert, G., Kadiiska, М., Mason, R. P., Cullen, W. R., Manimaran, A., Sarkar, S. N. and Sankar, P. (2010): Influence of repeated preexposure to arsenic on acetaminophen-induced oxidative stress in liver of male rats. Food Chem. Toxicol. 48, 605610.

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  • Palma-Lara, I., Martínez-Castillo, M., Quintana-Pérez, J. C., Arellano-Mendoza, M. G., Tamay-Cach, F., Valenzuela-Limón, O. L. and Hernández-Zavala, A. (2020): Arsenic exposure: a public health problem leading to several cancers. Regul. Toxicol. Pharmac. 110, 104539.

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  • Pan, W., Ye, X., Zhu, Z., Li, C., Zhou, J. and Liu, J. (2020): A case-control study of arsenic exposure with the risk of primary ovarian insufficiency in women. Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res. 27, 2522025229.

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  • Rami, Y., Ebrahimpour, K., Maghami, M., Shoshtari-Yeganeh, B. and Kelishadi, R. (2022): The association between heavy metals exposure and sex hormones: a systematic review on current evidence. Biol. Trace Elem. Res. 200, 34913510. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-021-02947-0.

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  • Renu, K., Madhyastha, H., Madhyastha, R., Maruyama, M., Vinayagam, S. and Gopalakrishnan, A. V. (2018): Review on molecular and biochemical insights of arsenic-mediated male reproductive toxicity. Life Sci. 212, 3758.

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  • Rossman, T. G. (2003): Mechanism of arsenic carcinogenesis: an integrated approach. Mutat. Res. 533, 3765.

  • Stoica, A., Pentecost, E. and Martin, M. B. (2000): Effects of arsenite on estrogen receptor-alpha expression and activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Endocrinology 141, 35953602.

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  • Wai, K. M., Umezaki, M., Mar, O., Umemura, M. and Watanabe, C. (2019): Arsenic exposure through drinking water and oxidative stress status: a cross-sectional study in the Ayeyarwady region, Myanmar. J. Trace Elem. Med. Biol. 54, 103109.

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Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Ferenc BASKA

Editorial assistant: Szilvia PÁLINKÁS

 

Editorial Board

  • Mária BENKŐ (Acta Veterinaria Hungarica, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Gábor BODÓ (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Béla DÉNES (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest Hungary)
  • Edit ESZTERBAUER (Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Hedvig FÉBEL (National Agricultural Innovation Centre, Herceghalom, Hungary)
  • László FODOR (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • János GÁL (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Balázs HARRACH (Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Peter MASSÁNYI (Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Nitra, Slovak Republic)
  • Béla NAGY (Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Tibor NÉMETH (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Zsuzsanna NEOGRÁDY (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Dušan PALIĆ (Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany)
  • Alessandra PELAGALLI (University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy)
  • Kurt PFISTER (Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany)
  • László SOLTI (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • József SZABÓ (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Péter VAJDOVICH (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • János VARGA (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Štefan VILČEK (University of Veterinary Medicine in Kosice, Kosice, Slovak Republic)
  • Károly VÖRÖS (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Herbert WEISSENBÖCK (University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria)
  • Attila ZSARNOVSZKY (Szent István University, Gödöllő, Hungary)

ACTA VETERINARIA HUNGARICA
Institute for Veterinary Medical Research
Centre for Agricultural Research
Hungarian Academy of Sciences
P.O. Box 18, H-1581 Budapest, Hungary
Phone: (36 1) 287 7073 (ed.-in-chief) or (36 1) 467 4081 (editor)

E-mail: acta.veterinaria@univet.hu (ed.-in-chief)

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2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
972
Journal Impact Factor 0.900
Rank by Impact Factor

Veterinary Sciences 95/143

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0.900
5 Year
Impact Factor
1.1
Journal Citation Indicator 0.47
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Veterinary Sciences 103/170

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
38
Scimago
Journal Rank
0.277
Scimago Quartile Score

Veterinary (miscellaneous) Q2

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1.9
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Veterinary 76/186 (59th PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
0.475

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
1040
Journal Impact Factor 0,959
Rank by Impact Factor Veterinary Sciences 103/144
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,876
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,222
Journal Citation Indicator 0,48
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator Veterinary Sciences 106/168
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
36
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,313
Scimago Quartile Score Veterinary (miscellaneous) (Q2)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1,7
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Veterinary 79/183 (Q2)
Scopus
SNIP
0,610

2020  
Total Cites 987
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
0,955
Rank by Veterinary Sciences 101/146 (Q3)
Impact Factor  
Impact Factor 0,920
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 1,164
Impact Factor
Journal  0,57
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Veterinary Sciences 93/166 (Q3)
Citation Indicator   
Citable 49
Items
Total 49
Articles
Total 0
Reviews
Scimago 33
H-index
Scimago 0,395
Journal Rank
Scimago Veterinary (miscellaneous) Q2
Quartile Score  
Scopus 355/217=1,6
Scite Score  
Scopus General Veterinary 73/183 (Q2)
Scite Score Rank  
Scopus 0,565
SNIP  
Days from  145
submission  
to acceptance  
Days from  150
acceptance  
to publication  
Acceptance 19%
Rate

 

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
798
Impact Factor 0,991
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,897
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,092
Immediacy
Index
0,119
Citable
Items
59
Total
Articles
59
Total
Reviews
0
Cited
Half-Life
9,1
Citing
Half-Life
9,2
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00080
Article Influence
Score
0,253
% Articles
in
Citable Items
100,00
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,09791
Average
IF
Percentile
42,606
Scimago
H-index
32
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,372
Scopus
Scite Score
335/213=1,6
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
General Veterinary 62/178 (Q2)
Scopus
SNIP
0,634
Acceptance
Rate
18%

 

Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1951
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0236-6290 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2705 (Online)

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