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  • 1 Department for Companion Animals, Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Veterinärplatz 1, 1210, Vienna, Austria
  • 2 Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Vienna, Austria
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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively the prevalence of the complicated and uncomplicated forms of babesiosis and to evaluate various laboratory and clinical parameters of dogs infected with Babesia canis in order to assess their prognostic value regarding the outcomes of the disease. Medical records, complete blood count and serum biochemical analysis from the animal hospital information system of 240 dogs were reviewed and evaluated retrospectively. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to ascertain correlations between alterations in the obtained parameters and survival probability. The results showed that creatinine levels of more than 5 mg/dL and phosphate levels of more than 3 mmol/L have a highly significant link to death (P ≤ 0.001). Albumin levels of <2.2 g/dL (P = 0.003) and a rectal body temperature below 38 °C (P ≤ 0.001) may also serve as prognostic markers for the severity of the disease. If renal involvement was present, 33.9% of the dogs died, while 40.0% of the dogs died in the presence of pancreatitis. The parameters creatinine, phosphate, albumin and rectal temperature serve as reliable predictive markers of an increased risk of death in the case of an infection with B. canis.

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