Authors:
Alexandra Valenčáková Department of Biology and Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Komenského 73, 040 01 Košice, Slovak Republic

Search for other papers by Alexandra Valenčáková in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2123-2559
,
Monika Sučik Department of Biology and Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Komenského 73, 040 01 Košice, Slovak Republic

Search for other papers by Monika Sučik in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1893-8892
,
Oľga Danišová Department of Biology and Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Komenského 73, 040 01 Košice, Slovak Republic

Search for other papers by Oľga Danišová in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5312-9500
,
Petra Kandráčová Department of Biology and Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Komenského 73, 040 01 Košice, Slovak Republic

Search for other papers by Petra Kandráčová in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Martin Tomko Department of Biology and Physiology, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Komenského 73, 040 01 Košice, Slovak Republic

Search for other papers by Martin Tomko in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Igor Valocký Equine Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy, Košice, Slovak Republic

Search for other papers by Igor Valocký in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7583-4323
Restricted access

Abstract

The aim of this study was to draw attention to the risk of transmission of Encephalitozoon, Cryptosporidium and Blastocystis infection due to high animal migration and to point out that even wild animals can be a source of many zoonotic diseases. Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Cryptosporidium spp. and Blastocystis spp. are frequent microscopic organisms that parasitise humans, domestic and wild animals. Two hundred and fifty-five faecal specimens were collected from wild boars, badgers, wolves, bears, foxes and deer from 15 locations in Slovakia. Sequencing of positive PCR products and subsequent sequence comparison with GenBank sequences identified Blastocystis spp. in five wild boars. The ST 5 (n = 4) and ST 10 (n = 1) subtypes were determined by genotyping. We identified Encephalitozoon cuniculi in five wild boars, and genotype II (n = 5) was determined on the basis of ITS repeat sequences. Cryptosporidium scrofarum was sequenced in wolves (n = 4) and wild boars (n = 1), while Cryptosporidium suis only in wild boars (n = 2). None of the wild boars had a mixed infection.

  • Åkerstedt, J. and Kapel, C. M. (2003): Survey for Encephalitozoon cuniculi in polar foxes (Alopex lagopus) in Greenland. J. Wildl. Dis. 39 ,228232.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bednarska, M. , Bajer, A. , Sinski, E. , Girouard, A. S. , Tamang, L. and Graczyk, T. K. (2007): Fluorescent in situ hybridisation as a tool to retrospectively identify Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia in samples from terrestrial Mammalian wildlife. Parasitol. Res. 100 ,455460.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bohm-Gloning, B. , Knobloch, J. and Walderich, B. (1997): Five subgroups of Blastocystis hominis from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients revealed by restriction site analysis of PCR-amplified 16S-like rDNA. Trop. Med. Int. Health 2 ,771778.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Danišová, O. , Valenčáková, A. , Stanko, M. , Luptáková, L. and Hasajová, A. (2015): First report of Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon smallpox infections of wild mice in Slovakia. Ann. Agric. Environ. Med. 22 ,251252.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Danišová, O. , Valenčáková, A. , Stanko, M. , Luptáková, L. , Hatalová, E. and Csanády, A. (2017): Rodents as a reservoir of infection caused by multiple zoonotic species/genotypes of C. parvum, C. hominis, C. suis, C. scrofarum, and the first evidence of C. muskrat genotypes I and II of rodents in Europe. Acta Tropica 172 ,2935.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Fayer, R. , Santín, M. and Macarisin, D. (2010): Cryptosporidium ubiquitum n. sp. in animals and humans. Vet. Parasitol. 172 ,2332.

  • Feng, Y. (2010): Cryptosporidium in wild placental mammals. Exp. Parasitol. 124 ,128137.

  • Feng, Y. , Ryan, U. M. and Xiao, L. (2018): Genetic diversity and population structure of Cryptosporidium. Trends Parasitol. 34 ,9971011.

  • Fredriksson-Ahomaa, M. , London, L. , Skrzypczak, T. , Kantala, T. , Laamanen, I. , Bistrom, M. , Maunula, L. and Gadd, T. (2020): Foodborne zoonoses common in hunted wild boars. EcoHealth 17 ,512522.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Horčičková, M. , Čondlová, Š. , Holubová, N. , Sak, B. , Květoňová, D. , Hlásková, L. , Konečný, R. , Sedláček, F. , Clark, M. , Giddings, C. , McEvoy, J. and Kváč, M. (2019): Diversity of Cryptosporidium in common voles and description of Cryptosporidium alticolis sp. n. and Cryptosporidium microti sp. n. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae). Parasitology 17 ,114.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kicia, M. , Wesolowska, M. , Kopacz, Z. , Jakuszko, K. , Sak, B. , Květonová, D. , Krajewska, M. and Kváč, M. (2016): Prevalence and molecular characteristics of urinary and intestinal microsporidia infections in renal transplant recipients. Clin. Microbiol. Infect. 22 ,462. e5–9.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kvac, M. , Myskova, E. , Holubova, N. , Kellnerova, K. , Kicia, M. , Rajsky D. , McEvoy, J. , Feng, Y. , Hanzal, V. and Sak, B. (2021): Occurrence and genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in wild foxes, wolves, jackals, and bears in central Europe. Folia Parasitol. (Praha) 68 ,2021.002.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kváč, M. , Hofmannová L. , Bertolino, S. , Wauters, L. , Tosi, G. and Modrý, D. (2008): Natural infection with two genotypes of Cryptosporidium in red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in Italy. Folia Parasitol. (Praha) 55 ,9599.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Leetz, A. S. , Sotiriadou, I. , Ongerth, J. and Karanis, P. (2007): An evaluation of primers amplifying DNA targets for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. using C. parvum HNJ-1 Japanese isolate in water samples. Parasitol. Res. 101 ,951962.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Li, J. , Karim, M. R. , Li, D. , Rahaman Sumon, S. M. M. , Siddiki, S. , Rume, F. I. , Sun, R. , Jia, Z. and Zhang, L. (2019): Molecular characterisation of Blastocystis sp. in captive wildlife in Bangladesh National Zoo: non-human primates with high prevalence and zoonotic significance. Int. J. Parasitol. Parasites Wildl. 10 ,314320.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Luptáková, L. , Bálent, P. , Valenčáková, A. , Hisira, V. and Petrovova, E. (2010): Detection of Toxoplasma gondii and Encephalitozoon spp. in wild boars by serological and molecular methods. Rev. Med. Vet. 161 ,559563.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Malcekova, B. , Valencakova, A. , Molnar, L. and Kocisova, A. (2013): First detection and genotyping of human-associated microsporidia in wild waterfowl of Slovakia. Acta Parasitol. 58 ,1317.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Maloney, J. G. , Molokin, A. , da Cunha, M. J. R. , Cury, M. C. and Santin, M. (2020): Blastocystis subtype distribution in domestic and captive wild bird species from Brazil using next generation amplicon sequencing. Parasite Epidemiol. Control 9 ,e00138.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Němejc, K. , Sak, B. , Kvetonova, D. , Hanzal, V. , Janiszewski, P. , Forejtek, P. , Rajsky, D. , Kotkova, M. , Ravaszova, P. , McEvoy, J. and Kvac, M. (2014): Prevalence and diversity of Encephalitozoon spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in wild boars (Sus scrofa) in central Europe. Parasitol. Res. 113 ,761767.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Russini, V. , Di Filippo, M. M. , Fanelli, R. , Polidori, M. , Berrilli, F. , Di Cave, D. , Novelletto, A. and Calderini, P. (2020): Characterization of prevalence and genetic subtypes of Blastocystis sp. in wild and domestic Suidae of central Italy aided by amplicon NGS. Vet. Parasitol. Reg. Stud. Reports 22 ,100472.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sak, B. , Kvac, M. , Petrzelkova, K. , Kvetonova, D. , Pomajbikova, K. , Mulama, M. , Kiyang, J. and Modry, D. (2011): Microsporidia diversity (fungi: microsporidia) among captured apes in European zoos and African shrines: evidence of zoonosis transmission. Folia Parasitol. (Praha) 58 ,8186.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Santaniello, A. , Cimmino, I. , Dipineto, L. , Agognon, A. L. , Beguinot, F. , Formisano, P. , Fioretti, A. , Menna, L. F. and Oriente, F. (2021): Zoonotic risk of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in animal-assisted interventions: laboratory strategies for the diagnosis of infections in humans and animals. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 18 ,9333.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Stensvold, C. R. and Clark, C. G. (2016): Molecular identification and subtype analysis of Blastocystis. Curr. Protoc. Microbiol. 43 ,20A.2.120A.2.10.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Stensvold, C. R. and Clark, C. G. (2020): Pre-empting Pandora’s box: Blastocystis subtypes revisited. Trends Parasitol. 36 ,229232.

  • Stensvold, C. R. , Suresh, G. K. , Tan, K. S. W. , Thompson, R. C. A. , Traub, R. J. , Viscogliosi, E. , Yoshikawa, H. and Clark, C. G. (2007): Terminology for Blastocystis consensus subtypes. Trends Parasitol. 23 ,9396.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Talabani, H. , Sarfati, C. , Pillebout, E. , van Gool, T. , Derouin, F. and Menotti, J. (2010): Disseminated infection with a new genovar of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in a renal transplant recipient. J. Clin. Microbiol. 48 ,26512653.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Tsukada, R. , Tsuchiyama, A. , Sasaki, M. , Park, C. H. , Fujii, Y. , Takesue, M. , Hatai, H. , Kudo, N. and Ikadai, H. (2013): Infections of Encephalitozoon in rodentia and Soricomorpha in Japan. Vet. Parasitol. 198 ,193196.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Valenčáková, A. , Kandráčová, P. , Kalinová, J. , Danišová, O. and Hasajová, A. (2014): Detection of Blastocystis hominis subtype 3 in the brown bear in the Slovak Republic. Folia Veterinaria 58 ,175178.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Yaghoobi, K. , Sarkari, B. , Mansouri, M. and Motazedian, M. H. (2016): Zoonotic intestinal protozoan of the wild boars, Sus scrofa, in Persian Gulf's coastal area (Bushehr province), Southwestern Iran. Vet. World 9 ,10471050.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Xiao, L. and Feng, Y. (2008): Zoonotic cryptosporidiosis. FEMS Immunol. Med. Microbiol. 52, 309323.

  • Xiao, L. , Bern, C. , Limor, J. , Sulaiman, I. , Roberts, J. , Checkley, W. , Cabrera, L. , Gilman, R. H. and Lal, A. A. (2001): Identification of 5 types of Cryptosporidium parasites in children in Lima, Peru. J. Infect. Dis. 183 ,492497.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Xiao, L. , Morgan, U. M. , Limor, J. , Escalante, A. , Arrowood, M. , ShulawW. , Thompson, R. C. , Fayer, R. and Lal, A. A. (1999): Genetic diversity within Cryptosporidium parvum and related Cryptosporidium species. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65, 33863391.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Collapse
  • Expand
  • Top

Author information is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE.

The manuscript preparation instructions is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE.

Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Mária BENKŐ

Managing Editor: András SZÉKELY

Editorial Board

  • Béla DÉNES (National Food Chain Safety Office, Budapest Hungary)
  • Edit ESZTERBAUER (Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Hedvig FÉBEL (National Agricultural Innovation Centre, Herceghalom, Hungary)
  • László FODOR (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Balázs HARRACH (Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Peter MASSÁNYI (Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Nitra, Slovak Republic)
  • Béla NAGY (Veterinary Medical Research Institute, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Tibor NÉMETH (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Zsuzsanna NEOGRÁDY (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Alessandra PELAGALLI (University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy)
  • Kurt PFISTER (Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany)
  • László SOLTI (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • József SZABÓ (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Péter VAJDOVICH (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • János VARGA (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Štefan VILČEK (University of Veterinary Medicine in Kosice, Kosice, Slovak Republic)
  • Károly VÖRÖS (University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Herbert WEISSENBÖCK (University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria)
  • Attila ZSARNOVSZKY (Szent István University, Gödöllő, Hungary)

ACTA VETERINARIA HUNGARICA
Institute for Veterinary Medical Research
Centre for Agricultural Research
Hungarian Academy of Sciences
P.O. Box 18, H-1581 Budapest, Hungary
Phone: (36 1) 467 4081 (ed.-in-chief) or (36 1) 213 9793 (editor) Fax: (36 1) 467 4076 (ed.-in-chief) or (36 1) 213 9793

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • Biological Abstracts
  • BIOSIS Previews
  • CAB Abstracts
  • Chemical Abstracts
  • Current Contents: Agriculture, Biology and Environmental Sciences
  • Elsevier Science Navigator
  • Focus On: Veterinary Science and Medicine
  • Global Health
  • Index Medicus
  • Index Veterinarius
  • Medline
  • Science Citation Index
  • Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch)
  • SCOPUS
  • The ISI Alerting Services
  • Zoological Abstracts

 

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
1040
Journal Impact Factor 0,959
Rank by Impact Factor Veterinary Sciences 103/144
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,876
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,222
Journal Citation Indicator 0,48
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator Veterinary Sciences 106/168
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
36
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,313
Scimago Quartile Score Veterinary (miscellaneous) (Q2)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
1,7
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Veterinary 79/183 (Q2)
Scopus
SNIP
0,610

2020  
Total Cites 987
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
0,955
Rank by Veterinary Sciences 101/146 (Q3)
Impact Factor  
Impact Factor 0,920
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 1,164
Impact Factor
Journal  0,57
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Veterinary Sciences 93/166 (Q3)
Citation Indicator   
Citable 49
Items
Total 49
Articles
Total 0
Reviews
Scimago 33
H-index
Scimago 0,395
Journal Rank
Scimago Veterinary (miscellaneous) Q2
Quartile Score  
Scopus 355/217=1,6
Scite Score  
Scopus General Veterinary 73/183 (Q2)
Scite Score Rank  
Scopus 0,565
SNIP  
Days from  145
submission  
to acceptance  
Days from  150
acceptance  
to publication  
Acceptance 19%
Rate

 

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
798
Impact Factor 0,991
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,897
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,092
Immediacy
Index
0,119
Citable
Items
59
Total
Articles
59
Total
Reviews
0
Cited
Half-Life
9,1
Citing
Half-Life
9,2
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00080
Article Influence
Score
0,253
% Articles
in
Citable Items
100,00
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,09791
Average
IF
Percentile
42,606
Scimago
H-index
32
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,372
Scopus
Scite Score
335/213=1,6
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
General Veterinary 62/178 (Q2)
Scopus
SNIP
0,634
Acceptance
Rate
18%

 

Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 1100 EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2022 Online subsscription: 710 EUR / 892 USD
Print + online subscription: 824 EUR / 1028 USD
Subscription fee 2023 Online subsscription: 732 EUR / 892 USD
Print + online subscription: 848 EUR / 1028 USD
Subscription Information Online subscribers are entitled access to all back issues published by Akadémiai Kiadó for each title for the duration of the subscription, as well as Online First content for the subscribed content.
Purchase per Title Individual articles are sold on the displayed price.

Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1951
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0236-6290 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2705 (Online)

Monthly Content Usage

Abstract Views Full Text Views PDF Downloads
Apr 2022 0 0 0
May 2022 0 0 0
Jun 2022 0 0 0
Jul 2022 0 0 0
Aug 2022 0 0 0
Sep 2022 83 18 8
Oct 2022 0 0 0