Authors:
J. Kátai Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences, Debrecen University Department of Agrochemistry and Soil Science H-4032 Debrecen 138 Böszörményi Str. Hungary

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M. Tállai Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences, Debrecen University Department of Agrochemistry and Soil Science H-4032 Debrecen 138 Böszörményi Str. Hungary

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Zs. Sándor Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences, Debrecen University Department of Agrochemistry and Soil Science H-4032 Debrecen 138 Böszörményi Str. Hungary

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Á. Oláh Zsuposné Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences, Debrecen University Department of Agrochemistry and Soil Science H-4032 Debrecen 138 Böszörményi Str. Hungary

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In a pot experiment the effect of bentonite and zeolite doses [0; 5; 10; 15 and 20 g·kg soil -1 ] was studied on some chemical properties and ten soil microbiological and enzymological properties of an acidic [pH(H 2 O) = 5.65] humic sandy soil [WRB: Lamellic Arenosol (Dystric)], as well as on the biomass of perennial ryegrass ( Lolium perenne L.), as test plant. The pot experiment was set up in 2007 and 2008 at the Department of Agrochemistry and Soil Science of the Debrecen University in three replications. The average results of the two year experiment can be summarized as follows: The pH increased due to the effect of small and medium amendment doses. The bentonite treatments proved to be more effective than the zeolite doses. As the pH increased, the hydrolytic acidity – in case of the bentonite treatments significantly – decreased. Concerning the easily available nutrient content of soil, the small and medium amendment doses turned out to be effective. The large bentonite doses reduced the nitrate-N content, the easily available phosphorus and potassium contents of soil. Large dose zeolite treatments decreased the nitrate-N content, but increased both the phosphorus and potassium content of soil, in most cases significantly. Regarding the measured soil microbial parameters, the small and medium amendment doses were the most effective. The bentonite and zeolite treatments increased the biomass of perennial ryegrass, especially the small and medium doses of bentonite and the large dose of zeolite brought about significant increases. According to the statistical analyses moderate and close correlations were found between the parameters studied. In the bentonite treatments a close correlation was established between the aerobic cellulose decomposing bacteria and saccharase enzyme activity (r = 0.864) of soil. In the case of zeolite treatments, a close correlation was found between the number of nitrifying bacteria and microbial biomass C (r = 0.911) of soil.

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  • Filep, Gy., 1995. Soil Analysis. (Lecture note) (In Hungarian) Debrecen University. Debrecen.

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  • Ghrair, A., Ingwersen, J. & Streck, T., 2008. Immobilization of heavy metals in soil using nanoparticles produced from zeolitic tuff. In: Book of Abstracts, Eurosoil 2008, Vienna, 25–29 August, 2008. (Eds.: Blum, W. E. H., Gerzabek, M. H. & Vodrazka, M. ) 211–212. University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (BOKU). Vienna.

  • Henzsel, I., 2008. Soil conservation in sandy soil. (In Hungarian) In: Talajvédelem (Különszám). Talajtani Vándorgyűlés, Nyíregyháza, május 28–29. 89–94. Talajvédelmi Alapítvány–Bessenyei György Könyvkiadó.

  • Huzsvai, L., 2004. Biometric methods in SPSS. SPSS applications. (In Hungarian) (Manuscript. 75–77. Debrecen University, Debrecen.

  • Jenkinson, D. S. & Powlson, D. S., 1976. The effect of biocidal treatments on metabolism in soil. A method for measuring soil biomass. Soil Biol. Biochem. 27. (8) 209–213.

  • Kátai, J. et al., 2007. The effect of bentonite on specific soil parameters and microbial characteristics of the carbon cycle. In: Proc. Joint International Conference on Long-term Experiments. 247–254. Debrecen University. Debrecen.

  • Lazányi, J., 2003. The importance of bentonite tuff in the amelioration of sandy soils. (In Hungarian) In: Conference on Agro-economy, Rural Development and Agro-informatics at the Millennium, Debrecen 1–2 April, 2003. 4–8. Debrecen University, Centre for Agricultural Sciences. Debrecen.

  • Lazányi, J., 2005. Effects of bentonite on the water budget of sandy soil. In: Technologii de Cultura Pentru Grau Si Porumb Sympozion International, 7–8 iulie Oradea-Romania. 293–300. University of Oradea Publishing House.

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  • Pártay, G., Rajkainé Végh, K. & Lukács, A., 2006. Potassium migration in root medium treated with potassium feldspar. (In Hungarian) Agrokémia és Talajtan. 55. 395–414.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Szili-Kovács, Tibor

Technical Editor(s): Vass, Csaba

Section Editors

  • Filep, Tibor (Csillagászati és Földtudományi Központ, Földrajztudományi Intézet, Budapest) - soil chemistry, soil pollution
  • Makó, András (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest) - soil physics
  • Pásztor, László (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest) - soil mapping, spatial and spectral modelling
  • Ragályi, Péter (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest) - agrochemistry and plant nutrition
  • Rajkai, Kálmán (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest) - soil water flow modelling
  • Szili-Kovács Tibor (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest) - soil biology and biochemistry

Editorial Board

  • Bidló, András (Soproni Egyetem, Erdőmérnöki Kar, Környezet- és Földtudományi Intézet, Sopron)
  • Blaskó, Lajos (Debreceni Egyetem, Agrár Kutatóintézetek és Tangazdaság, Karcagi Kutatóintézet, Karcag)
  • Buzás, István (Magyar Agrár- és Élettudományi Egyetem, Georgikon Campus, Keszthely)
  • Dobos, Endre (Miskolci Egyetem, Természetföldrajz-Környezettan Tanszék, Miskolc)
  • Fodor, Nándor (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Mezőgazdasági Intézet, Martonvásár)
  • Győri, Zoltán (Debreceni Egyetem, Mezőgazdaság-, Élelmiszertudományi és Környezetgazdálkodási Kar, Debrecen)
  • Imréné Takács Tünde (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest)
  • Jolánkai, Márton (Magyar Agrár- és Élettudományi Egyetem, Növénytermesztési-tudományok Intézet, Gödöllő)
  • Kátai, János (Debreceni Egyetem, Mezőgazdaság-, Élelmiszertudományi és Környezetgazdálkodási Kar, Debrecen)
  • Lehoczky, Éva (Magyar Agrár- és Élettudományi Egyetem, Környezettudományi Intézet, Gödöllő)
  • Michéli, Erika (Magyar Agrár- és Élettudományi Egyetem, Környezettudományi Intézet, Gödöllő)
  • Rékási, Márk (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest)
  • Schmidt, Rezső (Széchenyi István Egyetem, Mezőgazdaság- és Élelmiszertudományi Kar, Mosonmagyaróvár)
  • Tamás, János (Debreceni Egyetem, Mezőgazdaság-, Élelmiszertudományi és Környezetgazdálkodási Kar, Debrecen)
  • Tóth, Gergely (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest)
  • Tóth, Tibor (Agrártudományi Kutatóközpont, Talajtani Intézet, Budapest)
  • Tóth, Zoltán (Magyar Agrár- és Élettudományi Egyetem, Georgikon Campus, Keszthely)

International Editorial Board

  • Blum, Winfried E. H. (Institute for Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Wien, Austria)
  • Hofman, Georges (Department of Soil Management, Ghent University, Gent, Belgium)
  • Horn, Rainer (Institute of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Christian Albrechts University, Kiel, Germany)
  • Inubushi, Kazuyuki (Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Japan)
  • Kätterer, Thomas (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden)
  • Lichner, Ljubomir (Institute of Hydrology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovak Republic)
  • Nemes, Attila (Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Ås, Norway)
  • Pachepsky, Yakov (Environmental Microbial and Food Safety Lab USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA)
  • Simota, Catalin Cristian (The Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences, Bucharest, Romania)
  • Stolte, Jannes (Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, Ås, Norway)
  • Wendroth, Ole (Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Kentucky, USA)

Szili-Kovács, Tibor
ATK Talajtani Intézet
Herman Ottó út 15., H-1022 Budapest, Hungary
Phone: (+36 1) 212 2265
Fax: (+36 1) 485 5217
E-mail: editorial.agrokemia@atk.hu

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

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2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
not indexed
Journal Impact Factor not indexed
Rank by Impact Factor

not indexed

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
not indexed
5 Year
Impact Factor
not indexed
Journal Citation Indicator not indexed
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

not indexed

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
10
Scimago
Journal Rank
0.151
Scimago Quartile Score

Agronomy and Crop Science (Q4)
Soil Science (Q4)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
0.6
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Agronomy and Crop Science 335/376 (11th PCTL)
Soil Science 134/147 (9th PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
0.263

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
not indexed
Journal Impact Factor not indexed
Rank by Impact Factor

not indexed

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
not indexed
5 Year
Impact Factor
not indexed
Journal Citation Indicator not indexed
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

not indexed

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
10
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,138
Scimago Quartile Score Agronomy and Crop Science (Q4)
Soil Science (Q4)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
0,8
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Agronomy and Crop Science 290/370 (Q4)
Soil Science 118/145 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,077

2020  
Scimago
H-index
9
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,179
Scimago
Quartile Score
Agronomy and Crop Science Q4
Soil Science Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
48/73=0,7
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Agronomy and Crop Science 278/347 (Q4)
Soil Science 108/135 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,18
Scopus
Cites
48
Scopus
Documents
6
Days from submission to acceptance 130
Days from acceptance to publication 152
Acceptance
Rate
65%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
9
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,204
Scimago
Quartile Score
Agronomy and Crop Science Q4
Soil Science Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
49/88=0,6
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Agronomy and Crop Science 276/334 (Q4)
Soil Science 104/126 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,423
Scopus
Cites
96
Scopus
Documents
27
Acceptance
Rate
91%

 

Agrokémia és Talajtan
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Agrokémia és Talajtan
Language Hungarian, English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
1951
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
2
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia  
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0002-1873 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2713 (Online)

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