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  • 1 Islamic Azad University, Shahrekord, Iran
  • | 2 Islamic Azad University, Shahrekord, Iran
  • | 3 Islamic Azad University, Shahrekord, Iran
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Brucellosis is a zoonosis of economic importance that reduces productivity in livestock enterprises as it induces abortion in infected animals. A study was designed aimed at detecting Brucella in blood and lymph node specimens from camels by the use of real-time PCR in Iran. Sample collection and DNA extraction were done on blood (n = 135) and lymph node (n = 135) samples collected from 135 camels (abattoir survey) from both sexes at various ages in different seasons. The real-time PCR for species differentiation was based on unique genetic loci of B. melitensis and B. abortus. The regions were chosen for the construction of primers and TaqMan® probes for species differentiation: BMEII0466 gene for B. melitensis and Bru-Ab2_0168 gene for B. abortus. Brucella spp. were identified in 18 (13.33%) blood samples and 4 (2.97%) lymph node samples. This method showed to be effective in detecting B. abortus and B. melitensis in blood and lymph samples respectively. Brucella abortus was detected in 3 (2.22%) blood samples but was however, not detected in the lymph node samples. Brucella melitensis was only observed in 4 (2.97%) lymph node samples. Significant differences were observed on the blood prevalence of unknown Brucella spp. in different age groups and seasons (P < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences observed on the prevalence of B. abortus, B. melitensis, unknown Brucella spp. in different age groups, sex and seasons (P > 0.05). Therefore, Brucella was detected in apparent healthy camels slaughtered at an abattoir in Iran and this recommends the significance of the detection of Brucella in camels, since the infected camels appear to be healthy.

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Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Dóra Szabó (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Managing Editor: Dr. Béla Kocsis (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Co-editor: Dr. Andrea Horváth (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Editorial Board

  • Prof. Éva ÁDÁM (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Sebastian AMYES (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.)
  • Dr. Katalin BURIÁN (Institute of Clinical Microbiology University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Orsolya DOBAY (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ildikó Rita DUNAY (Institute of Inflammation and Neurodegeneration, Medical Faculty, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences (CBBS), Magdeburg, Germany)
  • Prof. Levente EMŐDY(Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Anna ERDEI (Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, MTA-ELTE Immunology Research Group, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Éva Mária FENYŐ (Division of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden)
  • Prof. László FODOR (Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. József KÓNYA (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Yvette MÁNDI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Károly MÁRIALIGETI (Department of Microbiology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. János MINÁROVITS (Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Béla NAGY (Centre for Agricultural Research, Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. István NÁSZ (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Kristóf NÉKÁM (Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers in Buda, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Eszter OSTORHÁZI (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Rozália PUSZTAI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Peter L. RÁDY (Department of Dermatology, University of Texas, Houston, Texas, USA)
  • Prof. Éva RAJNAVÖLGYI (Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ferenc ROZGONYI (Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Zsuzsanna SCHAFF (2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Joseph G. SINKOVICS (The Cancer Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA)
  • Prof. Júlia SZEKERES (Department of Medical Biology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Mária TAKÁCS (National Reference Laboratory for Viral Zoonoses, National Public Health Center, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Edit URBÁN (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary; Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)

 

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2020  
Total Cites 662
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
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Rank by Immunology 145/162(Q4)
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Impact Factor 1,904
without
Journal Self Cites
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Impact Factor
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Rank by Journal  Immunology 146/174 (Q4)
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Citable 42
Items
Total 40
Articles
Total 2
Reviews
Scimago 28
H-index
Scimago 0,439
Journal Rank
Scimago Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) Q4
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Scopus 438/167=2,6
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Scopus General Immunology and Microbiology 31/45 (Q3)
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Scopus 0,760
SNIP
Days from  225
sumbission
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Days from  118
acceptance
to publication
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Rate

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
485
Impact Factor 1,086
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,864
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,233
Immediacy
Index
0,286
Citable
Items
42
Total
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40
Total
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2
Cited
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Citing
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0,246
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95,24
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Percentile
7,690
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,352
Scopus
Scite Score
320/161=2
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 35/45 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,492
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16%

 

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
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