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Zahra Meshkat Antimicrobial Resistance Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

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Himen Salimizand Liver and Digestive Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran

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Yousef Amini Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center, Resistant Tuberculosis Institute, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran
Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

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Davood Mansury Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

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Abolfazl Rafati Zomorodi Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ferdowsi university of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran

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Zoleikha Avestan Emam Khomeini Hospital of Naqadeh, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran

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Azad Jamee Department of Endodontics, Dental Faculty, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran

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Jamal Falahi Department of Medicine, Zahedan Medical Branch, Islamic Azad University, Zahedan, Iran

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Hadi Farsiani Antimicrobial Resistance Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

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Azizollah Mojahed Department of Clinical Psychology, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

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Abstract

Acinetobacter baumannii, as a nosocomial pathogen has become a worldwide concern in recent years. In the current study, the resistance to tetracyclines and colistin were assessed in the isolates from different provinces of Iran.

During the timeline of this study, a number of 270 isolates of A. baumannii were collected from tracheal aspirates, wounds, urine and blood cultures. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for tetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, tigecycline and colistin were evaluated. Tetracycline resistance genes were assessed by PCR. The mean expression level of adeB, adeJ and adeG were assessed using semi quantitative Real-Time PCR. The clonal relationship of the isolates was evaluated by the repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR), International Clonal (IC) Lineage Multiplex PCR and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (Pasteur scheme) methods.

The MIC by microdilution method showed that 87.5, 51.4, 28, 0.74 and 0% of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, tigecycline and colistin respectively. The prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes was 99.2, 99.2, 98, 86.7, 10, 3.33, 0.37, 0% for adeB, adeJ, adeG, tetB, tetA(39), tetA, tetM and tetH in tetracycline-resistant isolates. Moreover, the expression level of adeB, adeJ, adeG genes in tigecycline-nonsusceptible A. baumannii (TNAB) strain was higher compared to the tigecycline-susceptible A. baumannii (TSAB). A broad genomic diversity was revealed, but ST2 was the most prevalent ST. Our results indicated that tetracycline resistance in Iran is mediated by resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) and tetB efflux pumps.

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Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Dóra Szabó (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Managing Editor: Dr. Béla Kocsis (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Co-editor: Dr. Andrea Horváth (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Editorial Board

  • Prof. Éva ÁDÁM (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Sebastian AMYES (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.)
  • Dr. Katalin BURIÁN (Institute of Clinical Microbiology University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Orsolya DOBAY (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ildikó Rita DUNAY (Institute of Inflammation and Neurodegeneration, Medical Faculty, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences (CBBS), Magdeburg, Germany)
  • Prof. Levente EMŐDY(Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Anna ERDEI (Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, MTA-ELTE Immunology Research Group, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Éva Mária FENYŐ (Division of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden)
  • Prof. László FODOR (Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. József KÓNYA (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Yvette MÁNDI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Károly MÁRIALIGETI (Department of Microbiology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. János MINÁROVITS (Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Béla NAGY (Centre for Agricultural Research, Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. István NÁSZ (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Kristóf NÉKÁM (Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers in Buda, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Eszter OSTORHÁZI (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Rozália PUSZTAI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Peter L. RÁDY (Department of Dermatology, University of Texas, Houston, Texas, USA)
  • Prof. Éva RAJNAVÖLGYI (Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ferenc ROZGONYI (Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Joseph G. SINKOVICS (The Cancer Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA)
  • Prof. Júlia SZEKERES (Department of Medical Biology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Mária TAKÁCS (National Reference Laboratory for Viral Zoonoses, National Public Health Center, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Edit URBÁN (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary; Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)

 

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2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
689
Journal Impact Factor 1.5
Rank by Impact Factor

Immunology (Q4)
Microbiology (Q4)

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
1.3
5 Year
Impact Factor
1.7
Journal Citation Indicator 0.34
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Immunology (Q4)
Microbiology (Q4)

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Scimago
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31
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0.333
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Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) (Q3)
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Microbiology (medical) (Q3)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
2.8
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 29/53 (46th PCTL)
Infectious Diseases 186/304 (38th PCTL)
Microbiology 85/124 (31st PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
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2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
696
Journal Impact Factor 2,298
Rank by Impact Factor Immunology 141/161
Microbiology 118/136
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
2,143
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,925
Journal Citation Indicator 0,39
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator Immunology 146/177
Microbiology 129/157
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
29
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Journal Rank
0,362
Scimago Quartile Score Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
3,6
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 26/56 (Q2)
Infectious Diseases 149/295 (Q3)
Microbiology (medical) 66/118 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,598

2020  
Total Cites 662
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
2,048
Rank by Immunology 145/162(Q4)
Impact Factor Microbiology 118/137 (Q4)
Impact Factor 1,904
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 0,671
Impact Factor
Journal  0,38
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Immunology 146/174 (Q4)
Citation Indicator  Microbiology 120/142 (Q4)
Citable 42
Items
Total 40
Articles
Total 2
Reviews
Scimago 28
H-index
Scimago 0,439
Journal Rank
Scimago Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) Q4
Quartile Score Medicine (miscellaneous) Q3
Scopus 438/167=2,6
Scite Score  
Scopus General Immunology and Microbiology 31/45 (Q3)
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Scopus 0,760
SNIP
Days from  225
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to acceptance
Days from  118
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to publication
Acceptance 19%
Rate

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
485
Impact Factor 1,086
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,864
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,233
Immediacy
Index
0,286
Citable
Items
42
Total
Articles
40
Total
Reviews
2
Cited
Half-Life
5,8
Citing
Half-Life
7,7
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00059
Article Influence
Score
0,246
% Articles
in
Citable Items
95,24
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,07317
Average
IF
Percentile
7,690
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,352
Scopus
Scite Score
320/161=2
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 35/45 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,492
Acceptance
Rate
16%

 

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1954
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
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Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1217-8950 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2640 (Online)

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