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Nilgün KansakMedical Microbiology Laboratory, Haydarpaşa Numune Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey

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Sebahat AksarayDepartment of Medical Microbiology, University of Health Sciences-Hamidiye Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey

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Müge AslanMedical Microbiology Laboratory, Haydarpaşa Numune Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey

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Rıza AdaletiMedical Microbiology Laboratory, Haydarpaşa Numune Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey

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Nevriye GönüllüDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey

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Abstract

In this study investigation of plasmid-mediated mcr 1-5 resistance genes was performed among multidrug-resistant (MDR) colistin sensitive and resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli strains isolated in our laboratory. We aimed to evaluate automated system (Vitek-2), broth microdilution (BMD) reference method and chromogenic media performance. Totally 94 MDR K. pneumoniae and six E. coli isolates were included in the study. CHROMID® Colistin R agar (COLR) (bioMerieux, France) was used to determine the colistin resistance by chromogenic method. Standard PCR amplification was performed using specific primers to screen the plasmid-mediated mcr 1-5 genes. Sixty-one isolates were resistant to colistin and 39 were susceptible with reference BMD. The essential and categorical agreement of Vitek-2 was determined as 100 and 99%. The sensitivity of COLR medium was 100%, the specificity was 97.5%. In our study mcr-1 was detected in eight isolates, while other mcr genes were not detected. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity of the COLR medium, it can be used in routine diagnostics for the detection of colistin resistance. In our study we detected 8% prevalence of mcr-1 among MDR strains however, two mcr-1 positive isolates were found sensitive to colistin by BMD.

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    Srijan A, Margulieux KR, Ruekit S, Snesrud E, Maybank R, Serichantalergs O, et al.. Genomic characterization of nonclonal mcr-1-positive multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from clinical samples in Thailand. Microb Drug Resist 2018; 24: 40310.

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    Özhelvacı Y. Investigation of existance of plasmid-mediated (mcr-1, mcr-2) and chromosomal colistin resistance genes (phop/phoq, pmra/pmrb) in members of enterobacteriaceae. Afyonkarahisar University of Health Sciences, Thesis; 2019.

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    Liassine N, Assouvie L, Descombes MC, Tendon VD, Kieffer N, Poirel L, et al.. Very low prevalence of mcr-1/mcr-2 plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in urinary tract Enterobacteriaceae in Switzerland. Int J Infect Dis 2016; 51: 45.

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    Zhang J, Chen L, Wang J, Butaye P, Huang K, Qiu H, et al.. Molecular detection of colistin resistance genes (mcr-1 to mcr-5) in human vaginal swabs. BMC Res Notes 2018; 11: 143.

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  • 26.

    Huang H, Dong N, Shu L, Sun Q, Chan EW, Chen S, et al.. Colistin-resistance gene mcr in clinical carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains in China, 2014–2019. Emerg Microbes Infect 2020; 9: 23745.

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Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Dóra Szabó (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Managing Editor: Dr. Béla Kocsis (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Co-editor: Dr. Andrea Horváth (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Editorial Board

  • Prof. Éva ÁDÁM (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Sebastian AMYES (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.)
  • Dr. Katalin BURIÁN (Institute of Clinical Microbiology University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Orsolya DOBAY (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ildikó Rita DUNAY (Institute of Inflammation and Neurodegeneration, Medical Faculty, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences (CBBS), Magdeburg, Germany)
  • Prof. Levente EMŐDY(Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Anna ERDEI (Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, MTA-ELTE Immunology Research Group, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Éva Mária FENYŐ (Division of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden)
  • Prof. László FODOR (Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. József KÓNYA (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Yvette MÁNDI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Károly MÁRIALIGETI (Department of Microbiology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. János MINÁROVITS (Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Béla NAGY (Centre for Agricultural Research, Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. István NÁSZ (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Kristóf NÉKÁM (Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers in Buda, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Eszter OSTORHÁZI (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Rozália PUSZTAI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Peter L. RÁDY (Department of Dermatology, University of Texas, Houston, Texas, USA)
  • Prof. Éva RAJNAVÖLGYI (Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ferenc ROZGONYI (Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Zsuzsanna SCHAFF (2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Joseph G. SINKOVICS (The Cancer Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA)
  • Prof. Júlia SZEKERES (Department of Medical Biology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Mária TAKÁCS (National Reference Laboratory for Viral Zoonoses, National Public Health Center, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Edit URBÁN (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary; Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)

 

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2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
696
Journal Impact Factor 2,298
Rank by Impact Factor Immunology 141/161
Microbiology 118/136
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
2,143
5 Year
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Journal Citation Indicator 0,39
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator Immunology 146/177
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29
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Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Scopus  
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3,6
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2020  
Total Cites 662
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
2,048
Rank by Immunology 145/162(Q4)
Impact Factor Microbiology 118/137 (Q4)
Impact Factor 1,904
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 0,671
Impact Factor
Journal  0,38
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Immunology 146/174 (Q4)
Citation Indicator  Microbiology 120/142 (Q4)
Citable 42
Items
Total 40
Articles
Total 2
Reviews
Scimago 28
H-index
Scimago 0,439
Journal Rank
Scimago Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) Q4
Quartile Score Medicine (miscellaneous) Q3
Scopus 438/167=2,6
Scite Score  
Scopus General Immunology and Microbiology 31/45 (Q3)
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Scopus 0,760
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2019  
Total Cites
WoS
485
Impact Factor 1,086
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,864
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,233
Immediacy
Index
0,286
Citable
Items
42
Total
Articles
40
Total
Reviews
2
Cited
Half-Life
5,8
Citing
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7,7
Eigenfactor
Score
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Article Influence
Score
0,246
% Articles
in
Citable Items
95,24
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,07317
Average
IF
Percentile
7,690
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,352
Scopus
Scite Score
320/161=2
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 35/45 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,492
Acceptance
Rate
16%

 

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1954
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
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Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
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Publisher
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ISSN 1217-8950 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2640 (Online)

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