Authors:
Sajjad AsgharzadehDepartment of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Search for other papers by Sajjad Asgharzadeh in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Rezvan Golmoradi ZadehDepartment of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Search for other papers by Rezvan Golmoradi Zadeh in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Majid Taati MoghadamDepartment of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Search for other papers by Majid Taati Moghadam in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Hamed Farahani EraghiyeDepartment of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Search for other papers by Hamed Farahani Eraghiye in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Behrooz Sadeghi KalaniDepartment of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran

Search for other papers by Behrooz Sadeghi Kalani in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Faramarz Masjedian JaziDepartment of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Search for other papers by Faramarz Masjedian Jazi in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Shiva MirkalantariDepartment of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Search for other papers by Shiva Mirkalantari in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2158-8598
Restricted access

Abstract

Escherichia coli ST131 is a pandemic clone with high antibiotic resistance, and it is a major causative agent of urinary tract infection (UTI) and bloodstream infections. This study evaluated the distribution and expression of virulence genes and genotyping of E. coli O25b/ST131 by Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) method among UTI in patients at Tehran hospitals, Iran.

A total of 107 E. coli isolates were collected from UTI patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the pabB gene was used to identify E. coli O25b/ST131 and the prevalence of sat and hlyA virulence genes was also analyzed. The microtiter method quantified biofilm formation ability in E. coli O25b/ST131. The Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to evaluate the expression of sat and hlyA genes. Finally, MLVA was performed for E. coli O25b/ST131 genotyping by targeting seven tandem repeats. SPSS-16 software was used for statistical analysis. Molecular study showed that 71% of isolates carried the pabB gene and were considered E. coli O25b/ST131 strains. Also, 45.8% and 17.8% of isolates carried sat and hlyA genes, respectively. The 57.9% isolates had biofilm formation ability. Expression of the studied virulence genes showed an increase in strong biofilm producing E. coli O25b/ST131 strains. A total of 76 (100%) E. coli O25b/ST131 strains were typed by the MLVA method.

High prevalence of E. coli O25b/ST131 isolates in UTI patients can be a serious warning to the treatment due to the high antibiotic resistance rate, expression of virulence genes, and biofilm formation.

  • 1.

    Mohebi S, Hossieni Nave H, Norouzi A, Kandehkar Gharaman M, Taati Moghadam M. Detection of extended spectrum beta lactamases on class I integron in escherichia coli isolated from clinical samples. J Mazandaran Univ Med Sci 2016; 26(138): 6676.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Jamali S, Tavakoly T, Mojtahedi A, Shenagari M. The phylogenetic relatedness of blaNDM-1 harboring extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the North of Iran. Infect Drug Resist 2020;13: 6517.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Haghighatpanah M, Mojtahedi A. Characterization of antibiotic resistance and virulence factors of Escherichia coli strains isolated from Iranian inpatients with urinary tract infections. Infect Drug Resist 2019; 12: 274754.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Bergeron CR, Prussing C, Boerlin P, Daignault D, Dutil L, Reid-Smith RJ, et al. Chicken as reservoir for extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli in humans, Canada. Emerg Infect Dis 2012; 18(3): 41521.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Manges AR, Geum HM, Guo A, Edens TJ, Fibke CD, Pitout JDD. Global extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) lineages. Clin Microbiol Rev 2019; 32(3): e0013518.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Sadeghi M, Ebrahim-Saraie HS, Mojtahedi A, Nikokar I, Roushan ZA. Genetic diversity and prevalence of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes among Escherichia coli strains isolated from inpatients with urinary tract infections. Gene Rep 2020; 21: 100957.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Platell JL, Johnson JR, Cobbold RN, Trott DJ. Multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli of sequence type ST131 in animals and foods. Vet Microbiol 2011; 153(1–2): 99108.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Alqasim A, Abu Jaffal A, Alyousef AA. Prevalence and molecular characteristics of sequence type 131 clone among clinical uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Saudi J Biol Sci 2020; 27(1): 296302.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Moghadam MT, Mirzaei M, Moghaddam MFT, Babakhani S, Yeganeh O, Asgharzadeh S, et al. The challenge of global emergence of novel colistin-resistant Escherichia coli ST131. Microb Drug Resist 2021; 27: 151324.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Roy PK, Ha AJ-W, Mizan MFR, Hossain MI, Ashrafudoulla M, Toushik SH, et al. Effects of environmental conditions (temperature, pH, and glucose) on biofilm formation of Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky and virulence gene expression. Poult Sci 2021; 100(7): 101209.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Nicolas-Chanoine MH, Bertrand X, Madec JY. Escherichia coli ST131, an intriguing clonal group. Clin Microbiol Rev 2014; 27(3): 54374.

  • 12.

    Mandomando I, Vubil D, Boisen N, Quintó L, Ruiz J, Sigaúque B, et al. Escherichia coli ST131 clones harbouring AggR and AAF/V fimbriae causing bacteremia in Mozambican children: emergence of new variant of fimH27 subclone. Plos Negl Trop Dis 2020; 14(5): e0008274.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Cha MK, Kang C-I, Kim SH, Cho SY, Ha YE, Wi YM, et al. Comparison of the microbiological characteristics and virulence factors of ST131 and non-ST131 clones among extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing Escherichia coli causing bacteremia. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 2016; 84(2): 1024.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Li W, Raoult D, Fournier P-E. Bacterial strain typing in the genomic era. FEMS Microbiol Rev 2009; 33(5): 892916.

  • 15.

    Moghadam M, Shariati A, Mirkalantari S, Karmostaji A. The complex genetic region conferring transferable antibiotic resistance in multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates. New Microbes New Infections 2020; 36: 100693.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Hadizadeh M, Norouzi A, Taghadosi R, Mohebi S, Mohammadi M, Hasanzade A, et al. Prevalence of qnr, intI, and intII genes in extendedspectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolated from clinical samples in Iran. Trop J Pharm Res 2017; 16(1): 1417.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Yousefi S, Mojtahedi A, Shenagari M. A survey of gyrA target-site mutation and qnr genes among clinical isolates of Escherichia coli in the north of Iran. Jundishapur J Microbiol 2018; 11(9).

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Moghadam MT, Nave HH, Mohebi S, Norouzi A. The evaluation of connection between integrons class I and II and ESBL-producing and Non-ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from clinical samples, Kerman. Iran J Med Microbiol 2016; 10: 19.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 19.

    Kangachar SA, Mojtahedi A. Evaluation of integrons classes 1–3 in extended spectrum beta-lactamases and multi drug resistant Escherichia coli isolates in the North of Iran. Gene Rep 2018; 12: 299303.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 20.

    Shahbazi S, Asadi Karam MR, Habibi M, Talebi A, Bouzari S. Distribution of extended-spectrum β-lactam, quinolone and carbapenem resistance genes, and genetic diversity among uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates in Tehran, Iran. J Glob Antimicrob Resist 2018; 14: 11825.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 21.

    Al-Kafaween M, Khan R, Bakar M, Tengku M. Characterization of biofilm formation by Escherichia coli: an in vitro study. J Appl Biol Biotechnol 2019; 7.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 22.

    Livak KJ, Schmittgen TD. Analysis of relative gene expression data using real-time quantitative PCR and the 2−ΔΔCT method. Methods 2001; 25(4): 4028.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 23.

    Caméléna F, Birgy A, Smail Y, Courroux C, Mariani-Kurkdjian P, Le Hello S, et al. Rapid and simple universal Escherichia coli genotyping method based on multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis using single-tube multiplex PCR and standard gel electrophoresis. Appl Environ Microbiol 2019; 85(6): e0281218.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 24.

    Shenagari M, Bakhtiari M, Mojtahedi A, Roushan ZA. High frequency of mutations in gyrA gene associated with quinolones resistance in uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from the north of Iran. Iran J Basic Med Sci 2018; 21(12): 1226.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 25.

    Mojtahedi A. The presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase as a risk factor for MDR in clinical isolation of Escherichia coli. Trop Biomed 2017; 34(1): 98109.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 26.

    Dadi BR, Abebe T, Zhang L, Mihret A, Abebe W, Amogne W. Distribution of virulence genes and phylogenetics of uropathogenic Escherichia coli among urinary tract infection patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. BMC Infect Dis 2020; 20(1): 108.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 27.

    Al-Jamei SA, Albsoul AY, Bakri FG, Al-Bakri AG. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli in urinary tract infections: a two-center, cross-sectional study of prevalence, genotypes and risk factors in Amman, Jordan. J Infect Public Health 2019; 12(1): 215.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 28.

    Minardi D, d'Anzeo G, Cantoro D, Conti A, Muzzonigro G. Urinary tract infections in women: etiology and treatment options. Int J Gen Med 2011; 4: 33343.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 29.

    Moore KN, Day RA, Albers M. Pathogenesis of urinary tract infections: a review. J Clin Nurs 2002; 11(5): 56874.

  • 30.

    Demirci-Duarte S, Unalan-Altintop T, Eser OK, Cakar A, Altun B, Sancak B, et al. Prevalence of O25b-ST131 clone and fosfomycin resistance in urinary Escherichia coli isolates and their relation to CTX-M determinant. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 2020; 98(1): 115098.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 31.

    Can F, Kurt-Azap Ö, İspir P, Nurtop E, Seref C, Loçlar İ, et al. The clinical impact of ST131 H30-Rx subclone in urinary tract infections due to multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli. J Glob Antimicrob Resist 2016; 4: 4952.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 32.

    Hojabri Z, Mirmohammadkhani M, Darabi N, Arab M, Pajand O. Characterization of antibiotic-susceptibility patterns and virulence genes of five major sequence types of Escherichia coli isolates cultured from extraintestinal specimens: a 1-year surveillance study from Iran. Infect Drug Resist 2019; 12: 93903.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 33.

    Coelho A, Mora A, Mamani R, López C, González-López JJ, Larrosa MN, et al. Spread of Escherichia coli O25b:H4-B2-ST131 producing CTX-M-15 and SHV-12 with high virulence gene content in Barcelona (Spain). J Antimicrob Chemother 2010; 66(3): 51726.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 34.

    Hojabri Z, Darabi N, Arab M, Saffari F, Pajand O. Clonal diversity, virulence genes content and subclone status of Escherichia coli sequence type 131: comparative analysis of E. coli ST131 and non-ST131 isolates from Iran. BMC Microbiol 2019; 19(1): 117.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 35.

    Kudinha T, Johnson JR, Andrew SD, Kong F, Anderson P, Gilbert GL. Escherichia coli sequence type 131 as a prominent cause of antibiotic resistance among urinary Escherichia coli isolates from reproductive-age women. J Clin Microbiol 2013; 51(10): 32706.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 36.

    Zhang S, Zhang Q, Huang J, Cao Y, Zhao Z, Li B. Epidemic potential of Escherichia coli O16:H41-ST131: compared with pandemic O25b:H30-ST131 lineage. Infect Drug Resist 2021; 14: 262532.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 37.

    Sarkar S, Vagenas D, Schembri MA, Totsika M. Biofilm formation by multidrug resistant Escherichia coli ST131 is dependent on type 1 fimbriae and assay conditions. Pathog Dis 2016; 74(3).

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 38.

    Safadi RA, Abu-Ali GS, Sloup RE, Rudrik JT, Waters CM, Eaton KA, et al. Correlation between in Vivo biofilm formation and virulence gene expression in Escherichia coli O104:H4. Plos One 2012; 7(7): e41628.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 39.

    Nielsen JB, Albayati A, Jørgensen RL, Hansen KH, Lundgren B, Schønning K. An abbreviated MLVA identifies Escherichia coli ST131 as the major extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing lineage in the Copenhagen area. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 2013; 32(3): 4316.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 40.

    Naseer U, Olsson-Liljequist BE, Woodford N, Dhanji H, Cantón R, Sundsfjord A, et al. Multi-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis for rapid and accurate typing of virulent multidrug resistant Escherichia coli clones. Plos One 2012; 7(7): e41232.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 41.

    Lindstedt B-A, Brandal LT, Aas L, Vardund T, Kapperud G. Study of polymorphic variable-number of tandem repeats loci in the ECOR collection and in a set of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Shigella isolates for use in a genotyping assay. J Microbiol Methods 2007; 69(1): 197205.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 42.

    Dolatyar Dehkharghani A, Haghighat S, Rahnamaye Farzami M, Rahbar M, Douraghi M. Clonal relationship and resistance profiles among ESBL-producing Escherichia coli 2021; 11(499).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 43.

    Samarasinghe S, Reid R, Al-Bayati M. The anti-virulence effect of cranberry active compound proanthocyanins (PACs) on expression of genes in the third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli CTX-M-15 associated with urinary tract infection. Antimicrob Resist Infect Control 2019; 8(1): 181.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 44.

    Clermont O, Dhanji H, Upton M, Gibreel T, Fox A, Boyd D, et al. Rapid detection of the O25b-ST131 clone of Escherichia coli encompassing the CTX-M-15-producing strains. J Antimicrob Chemother 2009; 64(2): 2747.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Collapse
  • Expand

 

The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE

Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Dóra Szabó (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Managing Editor: Dr. Béla Kocsis (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Co-editor: Dr. Andrea Horváth (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Editorial Board

  • Prof. Éva ÁDÁM (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Sebastian AMYES (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.)
  • Dr. Katalin BURIÁN (Institute of Clinical Microbiology University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Orsolya DOBAY (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ildikó Rita DUNAY (Institute of Inflammation and Neurodegeneration, Medical Faculty, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences (CBBS), Magdeburg, Germany)
  • Prof. Levente EMŐDY(Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Anna ERDEI (Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, MTA-ELTE Immunology Research Group, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Éva Mária FENYŐ (Division of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden)
  • Prof. László FODOR (Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. József KÓNYA (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Yvette MÁNDI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Károly MÁRIALIGETI (Department of Microbiology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. János MINÁROVITS (Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Béla NAGY (Centre for Agricultural Research, Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. István NÁSZ (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Kristóf NÉKÁM (Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers in Buda, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Eszter OSTORHÁZI (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Rozália PUSZTAI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Peter L. RÁDY (Department of Dermatology, University of Texas, Houston, Texas, USA)
  • Prof. Éva RAJNAVÖLGYI (Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ferenc ROZGONYI (Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Zsuzsanna SCHAFF (2nd Department of Pathology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Joseph G. SINKOVICS (The Cancer Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA)
  • Prof. Júlia SZEKERES (Department of Medical Biology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Mária TAKÁCS (National Reference Laboratory for Viral Zoonoses, National Public Health Center, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Edit URBÁN (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary; Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)

 

Editorial Office:
Akadémiai Kiadó Zrt.
Budafoki út 187-187, A/3, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary

Editorial Correspondence:
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Institute of Medical Microbiology
Semmelweis University
P.O. Box 370
H-1445 Budapest, Hungary
Phone: + 36 1 459 1500 ext. 56101
Fax: (36 1) 210 2959
E-mail: amih@med.semmelweis-univ.hu

 Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • Biological Abstracts
  • BIOSIS Previews
  • CAB Abstracts
  • Chemical Abstracts
  • Global Health
  • Index Medicus
  • Index Veterinarius
  • Medline
  • Referativnyi Zhurnal
  • SCOPUS
  • Science Citation Index Expanded

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
696
Journal Impact Factor 2,298
Rank by Impact Factor Immunology 141/161
Microbiology 118/136
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
2,143
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,925
Journal Citation Indicator 0,39
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator Immunology 146/177
Microbiology 129/157
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
29
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,362
Scimago Quartile Score Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
3,6
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 26/56 (Q2)
Infectious Diseases 149/295 (Q3)
Microbiology (medical) 66/118 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,598

2020  
Total Cites 662
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
2,048
Rank by Immunology 145/162(Q4)
Impact Factor Microbiology 118/137 (Q4)
Impact Factor 1,904
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 0,671
Impact Factor
Journal  0,38
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Immunology 146/174 (Q4)
Citation Indicator  Microbiology 120/142 (Q4)
Citable 42
Items
Total 40
Articles
Total 2
Reviews
Scimago 28
H-index
Scimago 0,439
Journal Rank
Scimago Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) Q4
Quartile Score Medicine (miscellaneous) Q3
Scopus 438/167=2,6
Scite Score  
Scopus General Immunology and Microbiology 31/45 (Q3)
Scite Score Rank  
Scopus 0,760
SNIP
Days from  225
submission
to acceptance
Days from  118
acceptance
to publication
Acceptance 19%
Rate

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
485
Impact Factor 1,086
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,864
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,233
Immediacy
Index
0,286
Citable
Items
42
Total
Articles
40
Total
Reviews
2
Cited
Half-Life
5,8
Citing
Half-Life
7,7
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00059
Article Influence
Score
0,246
% Articles
in
Citable Items
95,24
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,07317
Average
IF
Percentile
7,690
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,352
Scopus
Scite Score
320/161=2
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 35/45 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,492
Acceptance
Rate
16%

 

Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Publication Model Online only Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 1100 EUR/article
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2022 Online subsscription: 662 EUR / 832 USD
Print + online subscription: 740 EUR / 930 USD
Subscription fee 2023 Online subsscription: 680 EUR / 832 USD
Print + online subscription: 760 EUR / 930 USD
Subscription Information Online subscribers are entitled access to all back issues published by Akadémiai Kiadó for each title for the duration of the subscription, as well as Online First content for the subscribed content.
Purchase per Title Individual articles are sold on the displayed price.

Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1954
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1217-8950 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2640 (Online)

Monthly Content Usage

Abstract Views Full Text Views PDF Downloads
Jun 2022 0 0 0
Jul 2022 0 0 0
Aug 2022 0 0 0
Sep 2022 96 1 1
Oct 2022 119 1 2
Nov 2022 37 0 0
Dec 2022 8 0 0