Authors:
Ikram Ayari Laboratory Department, National Bone Marrow Transplant Centre, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia
Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, LR18ES39, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia

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Yosra Chebbi Laboratory Department, National Bone Marrow Transplant Centre, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia
Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, LR18ES39, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia

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Anis Raddaoui Laboratory Department, National Bone Marrow Transplant Centre, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia
Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, LR18ES39, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia

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Dorra Belloumi Department of Haematology, National Bone Marrow Transplantation, Tunis, Tunisia

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Siwar Frigui Laboratory Department, National Bone Marrow Transplant Centre, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia
Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, LR18ES39, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia

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Rim Werhni Laboratory Department, National Bone Marrow Transplant Centre, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia
Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, LR18ES39, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia

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Tarek Ben Othmen Department of Haematology, National Bone Marrow Transplantation, Tunis, Tunisia

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Nour Abedejlil Department of Haematology, National Bone Marrow Transplantation, Tunis, Tunisia

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Wafa Achour Laboratory Department, National Bone Marrow Transplant Centre, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia
Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, LR18ES39, 1006, Tunis, Tunisia

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Abstract

Carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are major human pathogens because, these cause high number of difficult-to-treat infections. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (AHSCT) recipients are highly exposed to these type of bacteria. The aim of our study was to investigate prevalence of CRE colonization in AHSCT patients and to determine genes encoding carbapenem resistance. A retrospective study conducted between January 2015 and December 2019, involved 55 patients colonized with CRE strains. We determined the rate of antibiotic resistance according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the carbapenem resistance genes by PCR assays for genes encoding most frequent β-lactamases namely, blaGES, blaKPC, blaIMI, blaNDM, blaVIM, blaIMP and blaOXA-48. Eighty-one episodes of CRE colonization were recorded in 55 patients, mainly suffering from acute leukaemia (30%) and aplastic anemia (26%). History of hospitalization was noted in 80 episodes. Prior antibiotic treatment, severe neutropenia and corticosteroid therapy were respectively found in 94%, 76% and 58% of cases. Among the 55 patients, six patients (11%) developed a CRE infection. The CRE responsible for colonization were carbapenemase producers in 90% of cases. They belonged mostly to Klebsiella pneumoniae (61/81) and Escherichia coli species (10/81). Antibiotic resistance rates were 100% for ertapenem, 53% for imipenem, 42% for amikacin, 88% for ciprofloxacin and 27% for fosfomycin. Molecular study showed that blaOXA-48 gene was the most frequent (60.5%), followed by blaNDM (58%). Thirty-five (43%) strains were co-producers of carbapenemases. In our study, we report a high rate of CRE intestinal colonization in AHSCT recipients of our center.

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    Heinz WJ, Buchheidt D, Christopeit M, Von Lilienfeld Toal M, Cornely OA, Einsele H, et al. Diagnosis and empirical treatment of fever of unknown origin (FUO) in adult neutropenic patients: guidelines of the infectious diseases working party (AGIHO) of the German society of hematology and medical oncology (DGHO). Ann Hematol 2017; 96(11): 177592. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00277-017-3098-3.

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Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Dóra Szabó (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Managing Editor: Dr. Béla Kocsis (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Co-editor: Dr. Andrea Horváth (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Editorial Board

  • Prof. Éva ÁDÁM (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Sebastian AMYES (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.)
  • Dr. Katalin BURIÁN (Institute of Clinical Microbiology University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Orsolya DOBAY (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ildikó Rita DUNAY (Institute of Inflammation and Neurodegeneration, Medical Faculty, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences (CBBS), Magdeburg, Germany)
  • Prof. Levente EMŐDY(Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Anna ERDEI (Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, MTA-ELTE Immunology Research Group, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Éva Mária FENYŐ (Division of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden)
  • Prof. László FODOR (Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. József KÓNYA (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Yvette MÁNDI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Károly MÁRIALIGETI (Department of Microbiology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. János MINÁROVITS (Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Béla NAGY (Centre for Agricultural Research, Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. István NÁSZ (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Kristóf NÉKÁM (Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers in Buda, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Eszter OSTORHÁZI (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Rozália PUSZTAI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Peter L. RÁDY (Department of Dermatology, University of Texas, Houston, Texas, USA)
  • Prof. Éva RAJNAVÖLGYI (Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ferenc ROZGONYI (Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Joseph G. SINKOVICS (The Cancer Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA)
  • Prof. Júlia SZEKERES (Department of Medical Biology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Mária TAKÁCS (National Reference Laboratory for Viral Zoonoses, National Public Health Center, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Edit URBÁN (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary; Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)

 

Editorial Office:
Akadémiai Kiadó Zrt.
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Editorial Correspondence:
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Institute of Medical Microbiology
Semmelweis University
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E-mail: amih@med.semmelweis-univ.hu

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2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
689
Journal Impact Factor 1.5
Rank by Impact Factor

Immunology (Q4)
Microbiology (Q4)

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
1.3
5 Year
Impact Factor
1.7
Journal Citation Indicator 0.34
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Immunology (Q4)
Microbiology (Q4)

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
31
Scimago
Journal Rank
0.333
Scimago Quartile Score

Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Infectious Diseases (Q3)
Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Microbiology (medical) (Q3)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
2.8
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 29/53 (46th PCTL)
Infectious Diseases 186/304 (38th PCTL)
Microbiology 85/124 (31st PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
0.484

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
696
Journal Impact Factor 2,298
Rank by Impact Factor Immunology 141/161
Microbiology 118/136
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
2,143
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,925
Journal Citation Indicator 0,39
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator Immunology 146/177
Microbiology 129/157
Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
29
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,362
Scimago Quartile Score Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
3,6
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 26/56 (Q2)
Infectious Diseases 149/295 (Q3)
Microbiology (medical) 66/118 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,598

2020  
Total Cites 662
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
2,048
Rank by Immunology 145/162(Q4)
Impact Factor Microbiology 118/137 (Q4)
Impact Factor 1,904
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 0,671
Impact Factor
Journal  0,38
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Immunology 146/174 (Q4)
Citation Indicator  Microbiology 120/142 (Q4)
Citable 42
Items
Total 40
Articles
Total 2
Reviews
Scimago 28
H-index
Scimago 0,439
Journal Rank
Scimago Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous) Q4
Quartile Score Medicine (miscellaneous) Q3
Scopus 438/167=2,6
Scite Score  
Scopus General Immunology and Microbiology 31/45 (Q3)
Scite Score Rank  
Scopus 0,760
SNIP
Days from  225
submission
to acceptance
Days from  118
acceptance
to publication
Acceptance 19%
Rate

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
485
Impact Factor 1,086
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
0,864
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,233
Immediacy
Index
0,286
Citable
Items
42
Total
Articles
40
Total
Reviews
2
Cited
Half-Life
5,8
Citing
Half-Life
7,7
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00059
Article Influence
Score
0,246
% Articles
in
Citable Items
95,24
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,07317
Average
IF
Percentile
7,690
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,352
Scopus
Scite Score
320/161=2
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
General Immunology and Microbiology 35/45 (Q4)
Scopus
SNIP
0,492
Acceptance
Rate
16%

 

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1954
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1217-8950 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2640 (Online)

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