Authors:
Nadia El mrimar Research Team of Epidemiology and Bacterial Resistance, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Rabat, Morocco
Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

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https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9832-9776
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El Mehdi Belouad Research Team of Epidemiology and Bacterial Resistance, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Rabat, Morocco
Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6841-7684
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Elmostafa Benaissa Research Team of Epidemiology and Bacterial Resistance, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Rabat, Morocco
Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

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Fatna Bssaibis Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

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Mohammed Jazouli Laboratory of Virology, Microbiology, Quality, Biotechnology, Ecotoxicology and Biodiversity, Faculty of Science and Technology, Hassan II University, Casablanca, Morocco

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My abdelaziz El alaoui Laboratoire des Productions Végétales, Animales et Agro-industrie, Equipe de Botanique, Biotechnologie et Protection des Plantes, Département de Biologie, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ibn Tofail, Kenitra, Morocco

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Adil Maleb Laboratory of Microbiology, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University Mohammed the First, Oujda, Morocco

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Mostafa Elouennass Research Team of Epidemiology and Bacterial Resistance, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Rabat, Morocco
Department of Clinical Bacteriology, Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

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Abstract

The rate of pandrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains is on the rise in all continents. This bacterium can acquire resistance to all antibiotics, even to colistin. Alterations in the lipid A or/and the two-component pmrAB were earlier detected in colistin resistance. We investigated and analyzed two strains of A. baumannii (ABRC1 and ABRC2) isolated from two patients admitted to intensive care unit with a septic shock. Both strains were resistant to all tested antibiotics including colistin with a MIC >256 mg L−1. Colistin resistance genes (pmrA, pmrB, lpxA, lpxC, lpxD, and lpsB) of two strains (ABRC1 and ABRC2) were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Obtained nucleic acid sequences were aligned with reference sequences of ATCC 19606 and 17987. In this study two amino acid mutations, N287D in the lpxC gene and E117K in the lpxD gene, were detected in both ABRC1 and ABRC2 strains. ABRC1 had an additional H200L mutation in the pmrA gene. Both colistin resistant strains harbored the same A138T mutation in the pmrB gene. The ABRC2 strain also had an alteration in the kinase domain, specifically an R263S substitution of the histidine kinase domain. Three identical mutations were found in the lpsB gene of both A. baumannii strains: Q216K + H218G + S219E. As a result, a newly deduced protein sequence in both ABRC1 and ABRC2 strains differed from those described in ATCC 17978 and 19606 strains was determined. Colistin resistance is multifactorial in A. baumannii. In our study we detected novel mutations in colistin resistant A. baumannii clinical isolates.

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    Arroyo LA, Herrera CM, Fernandez L, Hankins JV, Trent MS, Hancock REW. The pmrCAB operon mediates polymyxin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 and clinical isolates through phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2011; 55(8): 3743.

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    Beceiro A, Llobet E, Aranda J, Bengoechea JA, Doumith M, Hornsey M, et al. Phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A in colistin-resistant variants of Acinetobacter baumannii mediated by the pmrAB two-component regulatory system. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2011; 55(7): 33709.

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    Hood MI, Becker KW, Roux CM, Dunman PM, Skaar EP. Genetic determinants of intrinsic colistin tolerance in Acinetobacter baumannii. Infect Immun 2013; 81(2): 54251.

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Senior editors

Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Dóra Szabó (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Managing Editor: Dr. Béla Kocsis (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Co-editor: Dr. Andrea Horváth (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Editorial Board

  • Prof. Éva ÁDÁM (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Sebastian AMYES (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.)
  • Dr. Katalin BURIÁN (Institute of Clinical Microbiology University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Orsolya DOBAY (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ildikó Rita DUNAY (Institute of Inflammation and Neurodegeneration, Medical Faculty, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences (CBBS), Magdeburg, Germany)
  • Prof. Levente EMŐDY(Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Anna ERDEI (Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary, MTA-ELTE Immunology Research Group, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Éva Mária FENYŐ (Division of Medical Microbiology, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden)
  • Prof. László FODOR (Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. József KÓNYA (Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Yvette MÁNDI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Károly MÁRIALIGETI (Department of Microbiology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. János MINÁROVITS (Department of Oral Biology and Experimental Dental Research, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Béla NAGY (Centre for Agricultural Research, Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. István NÁSZ (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Kristóf NÉKÁM (Hospital of the Hospitaller Brothers in Buda, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Dr. Eszter OSTORHÁZI (Institute of Medical Microbiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Rozália PUSZTAI (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Prof. Peter L. RÁDY (Department of Dermatology, University of Texas, Houston, Texas, USA)
  • Prof. Éva RAJNAVÖLGYI (Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Prof. Ferenc ROZGONYI (Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Prof. Joseph G. SINKOVICS (The Cancer Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA)
  • Prof. Júlia SZEKERES (Department of Medical Biology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Mária TAKÁCS (National Reference Laboratory for Viral Zoonoses, National Public Health Center, Budapest, Hungary.)
  • Prof. Edit URBÁN (Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary; Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.)

 

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Language English
Size A4
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1954
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Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
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ISSN 1217-8950 (Print)
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