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  • 1 Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, Tamil Nadu, India
  • | 2 Thiagarajar College, Madurai 625 009, Tamil Nadu, India
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In recent years more attention is being paid to the presence of various non-pathogenic root fungal associations in plants of natural ecosystems for their role in various ecosystem processes. Despite their widespread reports in various ecosystems worldwide, our knowledge on root endophyte fungal association in plants from natural vegetation is far from complete. We assessed the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and dark septate endophyte (DSE) fungal association in plants of Velliangiri Hills of the southern Western Ghats region, due to limited information on the root fungal association in this region. Of the 147 plant taxa (belonging to 46 families) investigated from five different vegetation types ranging from montane grasslands to tropical rainforest, 141 were colonised by AM fungi and co-occurrence of DSE fungi along with AM fungi was observed in 74 plant taxa. We report AM and DSE fungal associations for the first time in 61 and 42 plant species, respectively. Determination of AM morphological types indicated the frequent occurrence of intermediate type and AM morphology is reported for the first time in 64 plant taxa. Spore morphotypes belonging to eleven species (in six genera) were isolated from the different vegetation types. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spore numbers neither differed significantly among vegetation types nor were related to AM fungal colonisation. Spores of Funneliformis geosporum was the most frequent spore morphotypes. Dark septate endophyte fungal association occurred in plants of all the vegetation types and was most frequent in herbs. Though no significant relationship was found between AM and DSE fungal colonisation within roots, a positive association was found in the occurrence of these two fungal groups.

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  • Zangaro, W., Nishidate, F. R., Vandresen, J., Andrade, G. and Nogueira, M. A. (2007): Root mycorrhizal colonization and plant responsiveness are related to root plasticity, soil fertility and successional status of native woody species in southern Brazil.J. Trop. Ecol. 23: 5362. https://doi.org/10.1017/s0266467406003713

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  • Zangaro, W., Rostirola, L. V., de Souza, P. B., Alves, R. A., Lescano, L. E. A. M., Rondina, A. B. L., Nogueira, M. A. and Carrenho, R. (2013): Root colonization and spore abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in distinct successional stages from an Atlantic rainforest biome in southern Brazil.Mycorrhiza 23: 221233. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00572-012-0464-9

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  • Zhang, T., Sun, Y., Shi, Z. and Feng, G. (2012): Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can accelerate the restoration of degraded spring grassland in Central Asia.Range Ecol. Manage. 65: 426432. https://doi.org/10.2111/rem-d-11-00016.1

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  • Zhang, Y., Guo, L. D. and Liu, R. J. (2004): Survey of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in deforested and natural forest land in the subtropical region of Dujiangyan southwest China.Plant Soil 261: 257263. https://doi.org/10.1023/b:plso.0000035572.15098.f6

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  • Zhao, Z. W., Wang, G. H. and Yang, L. (2003): Biodiversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in tropical rainforest of Xishuangbanna, southwest China.Fungal Divers. 13: 233242.

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The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE.

 

 

 

Senior editors

Managing Editors

Editorial Board

  • Gy. BORBÉLY (Debrecen)
  • A. ČARNY (Ljubljana)
  • A. CSERGŐ (Dublin)
  • B. CZÚCZ (Paris)
  • M. HÖHN (Budapest)
  • K. T. KISS (Budapest)
  • A. KUZEMKO (Uman)
  • Z. LOSOSOVÁ (Brno)
  • I. MÁTHÉ (Szeged)
  • E. MIHALIK (Szeged)
  • S. ORBÁN (Eger)
  • R. PÁL (Butte)
  • Gy. PINKE (Mosonmagyaróvár)
  • T. PÓCS (Eger)
  • K. PRACH (České Budejovice)
  • E. S. RAUSCHERT (Cleveland)
  • E. RUPRECHT (Cluj Napoca)
  • G. SRAMKÓ (Debrecen)
  • A. T. SZABÓ (Veszprém)
  • É. SZŐKE (Budapest)
  • B. TOKARSKA-GUZIK (Katowice)
  • B. TÓTHMÉRÉSZ (Debrecen)
  • P. TÖRÖK (Debrecen)

Botta-Dukát, Zoltán
E-mail: botta-dukat.zoltan@okologia.mta.hu

or

Lőkös, László
E-mail: acta@bot.nhmus.hu
Institute: Botanical Department, Hungarian Natural History Museum
Address: Könyves K. krt. 40. H-1097 Budapest, Hungary

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

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2020  
Scimago
H-index
19
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,417
Scimago
Quartile Score
Plant Science Q2
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
155/89=1,7
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Plant Science 221/445 (Q2)
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics 374/647 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,838
Scopus
Cites
260
Scopus
Documents
22
Days from submission to acceptance 127
Days from acceptance to publication 132
Acceptance
Rate
36%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
17
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,404
Scimago
Quartile Score
Plant Science Q2
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
164/91=1,8
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Plant Science 209/431 (Q2)
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics 358/629 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,699
Scopus
Cites
215
Scopus
Documents
23
Acceptance
Rate
30%

 

Acta Botanica Hungarica
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 900EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
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Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2021 Online subsscription: 580 EUR / 724 USD
Print + online subscription: 660 EUR / 824 USD
Subscription fee 2022 Online subsscription: 594 EUR / 740 USD
Print + online subscription: 676 EUR / 844 USD
Subscription Information Online subscribers are entitled access to all back issues published by Akadémiai Kiadó for each title for the duration of the subscription, as well as Online First content for the subscribed content.
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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Language English
French
German
Russian
Spanish
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
1954
Publication
Programme
2021 Volume 63
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0236-6495 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2578 (Online)

 

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