View More View Less
  • 1 Palynology and Plant Reproductive Biology Section, Department of Botany and Forestry, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore, West Bengal, India-721102
Restricted access

In view of the ongoing rarity of Ecbolium ligustrinum there is an urgent need for conservation of the species. For this, a detailed work was carried out regarding the untold story of its reproductive ecology. The work was done for three consecutive years (2015–2017) at Midnapore, West Bengal over three different populations collected from three different areas of West Bengal. Field data were also recorded from these three wild populations. The species produces gullet flowers with bi-labiate corolla having long slender tubes. The flowers exhibit one day of longevity. The flowers are visited by 10 species of insects. Among those, four species viz. Eristalis tenax, a Dipteran member and three ant species of Hymenoptera such as Camponotus sp., Formica sp. and Monomorium sp. are the effective pollinators. As per pollination efficiency, Eristalis tenax (PE i = 0.76) is the most successful one. The flowers are shortly protandrous (dichogamous) and passed by three distinct reproductive (male, bisexual and female) phases. The breeding system clearly depicts that the species is facultatively xenogamous supported by myophilous mode of pollination. However, geitonogamous type of pollination is also observed through myrmecophily, an atypical instance found in plants. Lastly, the plant retained some sort of autogamy through ‘fail-safe’ mechanism of pollination, an adaptation which might be developed in absence of pollinators. Therefore, undoubtedly it can be concluded that E. ligustrinum is a partially self-incompatible (ISI = 0.27) species having a mixed mating system, adapted for xenogamy through specialised mode of plant-pollinator interactions.

  • Antoń, S., Komoń-Janczara, E. and Deniso, B. (2017): Floral nectary, nectar production dynamics and chemical composition in five nocturnal Oenothera species (Onagraceae) in relation to floral visitors. –Planta 246(6): 10511067.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ashoka Babu, V. L., Arunachalam, G., Jayaveera, K. N., Madhavan, V. and Shanaz Banu (2011): Free radical scavenging activity of methanolic extract of Ecbolium viride (Forrsk). Alston roots. –Der Pharm. Lett. 3(4): 285288.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Asolkar, L. V., Kakkar, K. K. and Chakre, O. J. (1992): Second supplement to Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants with active principles, Part I (A–K). – Publications and information directorate, New Delhi, India, 414 pp.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Barrett, S. C. H. (1998): The evolution of mating strategies in flowering plants. –Trends Plant Sci. 3(9): 335341.

  • Barrett, S. C. H. and Harder, L. D. (1996): Ecology and evolution of plant mating. –Trends Ecol. Evol. 11(2): 7379.

  • Buza, L., Young, A. and Thrall, P. (2000): Genetic erosion, inbreeding and reduced fitness in fragmented populations of the endangered tetraploid pea Swainsona recta. –Biol. Conserv. 93(2): 177186.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Byers, K. J., Bradshaw, H. D. Jr. and Riffell, J. A. (2014): Three floral volatiles contribute to differential pollinator attraction in monkeyflowers (Mimulus). –J. Exp. Biol. 217: 614623.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cecilia, K. F., Ravindhran, R. and Duraipandiyan, V. (2012): Ecbolin A: a bioactive compound from the roots of Ecbolium viride (Forssk.) Alston. –Asian J. Pharm. Clin. Res. 4(5): 99101.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chaudhuri, D. and Murugan, S. (2012): In vitro antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of leaves and stem extracts of Ecbolium linneanum. –Int. J. Pharm. Bio. Sci. 3(3): 112120.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Charlesworth, D. and Charlesworth, B. (1995): Quantitative genetics in plants: the effect of the breeding system on genetic variability. –Evolution 49(5): 911920.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chittka, L., Spaethe, J., Schmidt, A. and Hickelsberger, A. (2001): Adaptation, constraint, and chance in the evolution of flower color and pollinator color vision. – In: Chittka, L. and Thomson, J. D. (eds): Cognitive ecology of pollination. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 106126.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cogoni, D., Sulis, E., Bacchetta, G. and Fenu, G. (2019): The unpredictable fate of the single population of a threatened endemic Mediterranean plant. –Biodiv. Conserv. 28(7): 17991813.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cruden, R. W. (1977): Pollen-ovule ratios: a conservative indicator of breeding systems in flowering plants. –Evolution 31(1): 3246.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Darlington, C. D. and La Cour, L. F. (1960): Handling of chromosomes. 3rd ed. George Allen and Unwin Ltd., London, 627 pp.

  • Datta, P. C. and Maiti, R. K. (1968): Pharmacognostic study on Ecbolium linneanum var dentata. –Q. J. Crude Drug Res. 8(4): 11891192.

  • Eckert, C. G., Samis, K. E. and Dart, S. (2006): Reproductive assurance and the evolution of uni-parental reproduction in flowering plants. – In: Harder, L. D. and Barrett, S. C. H. (eds): Ecology and evolution of flower. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 183203.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Esau, K. (1965): Plant anatomy. John Wiley & Sons, New York, USA, 571 pp.

  • Faegri, K. and van der Pijl, L. (1979): The principles of pollination ecology. 3rd ed. – Pergamon Press, Oxford, England, 244 pp.

  • Frankham, R. and Ralls, K. (1998): Inbreeding leads to extinction. –Nature 392: 441442.

  • Galen, C., Shykoff, J. A. and Plowright, R. C. (1986): Consequences of stigma receptivity schedules for sexual selection in flowering plants. –Amer. Nat. 127(4): 462476.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gentry, A. H. (1974): Flowering phenology and diversity in tropical Bignoniaceae. –Biotropica 6(1): 6468.

  • Ghosh, A. and Pal, P. K. (2017): Pollination ecology of Clerodendrum indicum (Lamiaceae): first report of deceit pollination by anther-mimicking stigma in a bisexual flower. –Rev. Biol. Trop. 65(3): 9881001.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gómez, J. M. (2002): Generalización en las interaeciones entre plantas y polinizadores. (Generalizations in the interactions between plants and pollinators). –Rev. Chil. Hist. Nat. 759(1): 105116.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Herrera, C. M. (1988): Biología y ecología de Viola cazorlensis. I. Variabilidad de characteres florales. –Anales Jard. Bot. Madrid. 45(1): 233246.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hooker, J. D. (1885): The Flora of British India. IV. – L. Reeve & Company Limited Ashford, Kent, UK, 802 pp.

  • Huang, Y., Zhang, C., Blackmore, S., Li, D. Z. and Wu, Z. K. (2006): A preliminary study on pollination biology of Omphalogramma souliei Franch. (Primulaceae), a species endemic to China. –Plant Syst. Evol. 261: 8998.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Inouye, D. W. (1980a): The effect of proboscis and corolla tube lengths on patterns and rates of flower visitation by bumblebees. –Oecologia 45(2): 197201.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Inouye, D. W. (1980b): The terminology of floral larceny. –Ecology 61(5): 12511253.

  • Jiang, N., Yu, W. B., Li, H. Z. and Guan, K. Y. (2010): Floral traits, pollination ecology and breeding system of three Clematis species (Ranunculaceae) in Yunnan province, southwestern China. –Austr. J. Bot. 58(2): 115123.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kalisz, S. and Vogler, D. W. (2003): Benefits of autonomous selfing under unpredictable pollinator environments. –Ecology 84(11): 29282942.

  • Kantsa, A., Raguso, R. A., Lekkas, T., Kalantzi, O. and Petanidou, T. (2019): Floral volatiles and visitors: a meta-network of associations in a natural community. –J. Ecol. 107(6): 25742586.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kearns, A. and Inouye, D. W. (1993): Techniques for pollination biologists. University Press of Colorado, Niwot, USA, 583 pp.

  • Kirtikar, K. R. and Basu, B. D. (1987): Indian Medicinal Plants, Vol. III. – International Book Publishers, Dehradun, India, 852 pp.

  • Kundu, A., Pal, P. K. and Karmakar, P. (2018): Pollinators of Ecbolium ligustrinum (Vahl) Vollesen: a shifting from melittophily to myophily. –Adv. Biores. 9(1): 106113.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lande, R. and Schemske, D. W. (1985): The evolution of self-fertilization and inbreeding depression. I. Genetic models. –Evolution 39(1): 2440.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Layek, U. Kundu, A. and Karmakar, P. (2020): Floral ecology, floral visitors and breeding System of Gandharaj lemon (Citrus × limon L. Osbeck). –Bot Pacif. 9(2): 113119.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lloyd, D. G. and Schoen, D. J. (1992): Self-and cross-fertilization in plants. I. Functional dimensions.– Int. J. Plant Sci. 153(3): 358369.

  • McCready, R. M., Guggolz, J., Silviera, V. and Owens, H. S. (1950): Determination of starch and amylose in vegetables. –Anal. Chem. 22(9): 11561158.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Opler, P. A., Baker, H. G. and Frankie, G. W. (1980): Plant reproductive characteristics during secondary succession in Neotropical lowland forest ecosystem. –Biotropica 12: 4060.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Prain, D. (1903): Bengal Plants. Vol. I.– Botanical Survey of India, Howrah, India, 668 pp.

  • Pyke, G. H., Kalman, J. R. M., Bordin, D. M., Blanes, L. and Doble, P. A. (2020): Patterns of floral nectar standing crops allow plants to manipulate their pollinators. –Sci. Rep. 10(1): 1660.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rodriguez-Perez, J. (2005): Breeding system, flower visitors and seedling survival of two endangered species of Helianthemum (Cistaceae). –Ann. Bot. 95(7): 12291236.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Saccheri, I., Kuussaari, M., Kankare, M., Vikman, P., Fortelius, W. and Hanski, I. (1998): Inbreeding and extinction in butterfly metapopulation. –Nature 3929(6675): 491494.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Saunders, N. E. and Sedonia, D. S. (2006): Reproductive biology and pollination ecology of the rare Yellowstone Park endemic Abronia ammophila (Nyctaginaceae).–Plant Species Biol. 21(2): 7584.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Souza, C. V., Nepi, M., Machado, S. R. and Guimarães, E. (2017): Floral biology, nectar secretion pattern and fruit set of a threatened Bignoniaceae tree from Brazilian tropical forest. –Flora 227: 4655.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Spears, E. E. Jr. (1983): A direct measure of pollinator effectiveness. –Oecologia 57(1–2): 196199.

  • Stebbins, G. L. (1974): Flowering plants: evolution above the species level. Belknap Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 480 pp.

  • Urbanska, K. M. (1989): Reproductive effort or reproductive offer? A revised approach to reproductive strategies of flowering plants.–Bot. Helv. 99(1): 4963.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Walsh, S. K., Pender, R. J., Junker, R. R., Daehler, C. C., Morden, C. W. and Lorence, D. H. (2019): Pollination biology reveals challenges to restoring populations of Brighamia insignis (Campanulaceae), a critically endangered plant species from Hawai‘i. –Flora 259: 151448.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Whitehead, M. R., Lanfear, R., Mitchell, R. J. and Karron, J. D. (2018): Plant mating systems often vary widely among populations. –Front. Ecol. Evol. 6: 19 (article 38).

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wolf, L. L. and Stiles, F. G. (1989): Adaptations for the ‘fail-safe’ pollination of specialized ornithophilous flowers. –Amer. Midl. Nat. 121(1): 110.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zapata, T. R. and Arroyo, M. T. K. (1978): Plant reproductive ecology of a secondary deciduous tropical forest in Venezuela. –Biotropica 10(3): 221230.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zeisler, M. (1933): Über die Abgrenzung der eigentlichen Narben-fläche mit Hilfe von Reaktionen. –Beih. Bot. Centralbl. Abt. 58: 308318.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

 

The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE.

 

 

 

Senior editors

Managing Editors

Editorial Board

  • Gy. BORBÉLY (Debrecen)
  • A. ČARNY (Ljubljana)
  • A. CSERGŐ (Dublin)
  • B. CZÚCZ (Paris)
  • M. HÖHN (Budapest)
  • K. T. KISS (Budapest)
  • A. KUZEMKO (Uman)
  • Z. LOSOSOVÁ (Brno)
  • I. MÁTHÉ (Szeged)
  • E. MIHALIK (Szeged)
  • S. ORBÁN (Eger)
  • R. PÁL (Butte)
  • Gy. PINKE (Mosonmagyaróvár)
  • T. PÓCS (Eger)
  • K. PRACH (České Budejovice)
  • E. S. RAUSCHERT (Cleveland)
  • E. RUPRECHT (Cluj Napoca)
  • G. SRAMKÓ (Debrecen)
  • A. T. SZABÓ (Veszprém)
  • É. SZŐKE (Budapest)
  • B. TOKARSKA-GUZIK (Katowice)
  • B. TÓTHMÉRÉSZ (Debrecen)
  • P. TÖRÖK (Debrecen)

Botta-Dukát, Zoltán
E-mail: botta-dukat.zoltan@okologia.mta.hu

or

Lőkös, László
E-mail: acta@bot.nhmus.hu
Institute: Botanical Department, Hungarian Natural History Museum
Address: Könyves K. krt. 40. H-1097 Budapest, Hungary

  • Scopus
  • Biological Abstracts
  • BIOSIS Previews
  • CAB Abstracts
  • Chemical Abstracts
  • Global Health
  • Referativnyi Zhurnal

 

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
not indexed
Journal Impact Factor not indexed
Rank by Impact Factor

not indexed

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
not indexed
5 Year
Impact Factor
not indexed
Journal Citation Indicator not indexed
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

not indexed

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
23
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,392
Scimago Quartile Score Plant Science (Q2)
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics (Q3)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
2,5
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Plant Science 205/482 (Q2)
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics 322/687 (Q2)
Scopus
SNIP
1,046

2020  
Scimago
H-index
19
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,417
Scimago
Quartile Score
Plant Science Q2
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
155/89=1,7
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Plant Science 221/445 (Q2)
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics 374/647 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,838
Scopus
Cites
260
Scopus
Documents
22
Days from submission to acceptance 127
Days from acceptance to publication 132
Acceptance
Rate
36%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
17
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,404
Scimago
Quartile Score
Plant Science Q2
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
164/91=1,8
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Plant Science 209/431 (Q2)
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics 358/629 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,699
Scopus
Cites
215
Scopus
Documents
23
Acceptance
Rate
30%

 

Acta Botanica Hungarica
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 900EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2022 Online subsscription: 594 EUR / 740 USD
Print + online subscription: 676 EUR / 844 USD
Subscription fee 2023 Online subsscription: 612 EUR / 740 USD
Print + online subscription: 696 EUR / 844 USD
Subscription Information Online subscribers are entitled access to all back issues published by Akadémiai Kiadó for each title for the duration of the subscription, as well as Online First content for the subscribed content.
Purchase per Title Individual articles are sold on the displayed price.

Acta Botanica Hungarica
Language English
French
German
Russian
Spanish
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
1954
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0236-6495 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2578 (Online)

 

Monthly Content Usage

Abstract Views Full Text Views PDF Downloads
Jan 2022 0 0 0
Feb 2022 0 0 0
Mar 2022 0 0 0
Apr 2022 53 5 6
May 2022 29 10 5
Jun 2022 44 4 0
Jul 2022 1 1 0