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  • 1 University of Physical Education, Cracow, Poland
  • | 2 University of Physical Education, Cracow, Poland
  • | 3 University of Physical Education, Cracow, Poland
  • | 4 University of Physical Education, Cracow, Poland
  • | 5 University of Granada, Granada, Spain
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Purpose

The aim of the study was to determine whether creatine malate (CML) supplementation results in similar ergogenic effect in sprinters and long-distance runners. The other goal was to compare changes in body composition, physical performance and hormone levels after six-week training in athletes, divided into subgroups supplemented with creatine malate or taking placebo.

Results

Six-week supplementation combined with physical training induced different effects in athletes. Significantly higher increases in relative and absolute peak power and total work (p < 0.05) were found in sprinters compared to other groups. Except for growth hormone, post-exercise venous blood serum hormone levels exhibited no statistically significant differences in athletes. After CML loading period, a significant increase in growth hormone was found in the group of sprinters.

Conclusions

A significant ergogenic effect was found in sprinters, which was reflected by the increase in anaerobic exercise indices and morphological indices and elevated growth hormone level, after graded exercise testing. The significant increase in the distance covered during graded test was only observed in supplemented long-distance runners, whereas no significant changes in maximal oxygen uptake, relative peak power and relative total work were noticed. This could be caused by later anaerobic threshold appearance in exercise test to exhaustion.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Rosivall, László

Honorary Editor(s)-in-Chief): Monos, Emil

Managing Editor(s): Bartha, Jenő; Berhidi, Anna

Co-editor(s): Koller, Ákos; Lénárd, László; Szénási, Gábor

Assistant Editor(s): G. Dörnyei (Budapest), Zs. Miklós (Budapest), Gy. Nádasy (Budapest)

Hungarian Editorial Board

    1. Benedek, György (Szeged)
    1. Benyó, Zoltán (Budapest)
    1. Boros, Mihály (Szeged)
    1. Chernoch, László (Debrecen)
    1. Détári, László (Budapest)
    1. Hamar, János (Budapest)
    1. Hantos, Zoltán (Szeged)
    1. Hunyady, László (Budapest)
    1. Imre, Sándor (Debrecen)
    1. Jancsó, Gábor (Szeged)
    1. Karádi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Kovács, László (Debrecen)
    1. Palkovits, Miklós (Budapest)
    1. Papp, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Pavlik, Gábor (Budapest)
    1. Spät, András (Budapest)
    1. Szabó, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Szelényi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Szolcsányi, János (Pécs)
    1. Szollár, Lajos (Budapest)
    1. Szücs, Géza (Debrecen)
    1. Telegdy, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Toldi, József (Szeged)
    1. Tósaki, Árpád (Debrecen)

International Editorial Board

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    1. W. Benjelloun (Rabat)
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    1. L. F. Zhang (Xi'an)

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Language English
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Foundation
1950
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Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
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ISSN 0231-424X (Print)
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