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F Ihász Hungarian School Sport Federation, Budapest, Hungary

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I Karsai Hungarian School Sport Federation, Budapest, Hungary

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M Kaj Hungarian School Sport Federation, Budapest, Hungary

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O Marton Hungarian School Sport Federation, Budapest, Hungary

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KJ Finn University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA, USA

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T Csányi Hungarian School Sport Federation, Budapest, Hungary

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As consequence of the expansion of sedentary lifestyle among schoolchildren the prevalence of particular symptoms related to decreased cardiorespiratory fitness increases. The purpose of this study was twofolds, on one hand to compare boys in three developmental groups: second childhood (G1), puberty (G2), young adult (G3) and on the other hand to compare groups classified on resting systolic blood pressure (RSBP) to differentiate cardiorespiratory output determining factors both at rest and at maximal load. Randomly selected apparently healthy boys were assessed, all subjects (n = 282) performed an incremental treadmill test until fatigue. Heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), and oxygen consumption were measured. Resting HR was higher and resting SBP and DBP were lower in the G1 as compared to G2 and G3 (p < 0.05) but not differed at maximal loads. However indicators of cardiovascular load differed between groups. The oxygen pulse and Q were the lowest in the G1 and increased significantly between groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion based on our data we can suggest that there is an observable development of hypertension associated with maturation and cardiac output determining factors.

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Editor(s)-in-Chief: Rosivall, László

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
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