Authors:
J. Adams Morristown Memorial Hospital Department of Surgery Morristown NJ 07960 USA

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L. Difazio Morristown Memorial Hospital Department of Surgery Morristown NJ 07960 USA

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R. Rolandelli Morristown Memorial Hospital Department of Surgery Morristown NJ 07960 USA

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J. Luján Morristown Memorial Hospital Department of Surgery Morristown NJ 07960 USA

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Gy Haskó
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B. Csóka UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School Department of Surgery Newark NJ 07103 USA

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Zs Selmeczy Hungarian Academy of Sciences Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Experimental Medicine Budapest Hungary

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Z. Németh
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The transcription factor HIF-1 is one of the principal mediators of homeostasis in human tissues exposed to hypoxia. It is implicated in virtually every process of rapid gene expression in response to low oxygen levels. The most common causes of tissue hypoxia are inflammation and/or insufficient circulation or a combination of both. Inflamed tissues and the areas surrounding malignant tumors are characterized by hypoxia and low concentrations of glucose. Serious and generalized inflammation can lead to sepsis and circulatory collapse resulting in acute or chronic tissue hypoxia in various vital organs which induces a rapid homeostatic process in all nucleated cells of affected organs in the human body. Under hypoxic conditions the alpha and beta subunits of HIF-1 make an active heterodimer and drive the transcription of over 60 genes important for cell survival, adaptation, anaerobic metabolism, immune reaction, cytokine production, vascularization and general tissue homeostasis. In addition, HIF-1 plays a key role in the development of physiological systems in fetal and postnatal life. It is also a critical mediator of cancer, lung and cardiovascular diseases. The better understanding of the functions of HIF-1 and the pharmacological modulation of its activity could mean a successful therapeutic approach to these diseases.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Rosivall, László

Honorary Editor(s)-in-Chief): Monos, Emil

Managing Editor(s): Bartha, Jenő; Berhidi, Anna

Co-editor(s): Koller, Ákos; Lénárd, László; Szénási, Gábor

Assistant Editor(s): G. Dörnyei (Budapest), Zs. Miklós (Budapest), Gy. Nádasy (Budapest)

Hungarian Editorial Board

    1. Benedek, György (Szeged)
    1. Benyó, Zoltán (Budapest)
    1. Boros, Mihály (Szeged)
    1. Chernoch, László (Debrecen)
    1. Détári, László (Budapest)
    1. Hamar, János (Budapest)
    1. Hantos, Zoltán (Szeged)
    1. Hunyady, László (Budapest)
    1. Imre, Sándor (Debrecen)
    1. Jancsó, Gábor (Szeged)
    1. Karádi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Kovács, László (Debrecen)
    1. Palkovits, Miklós (Budapest)
    1. Papp, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Pavlik, Gábor (Budapest)
    1. Spät, András (Budapest)
    1. Szabó, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Szelényi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Szolcsányi, János (Pécs)
    1. Szollár, Lajos (Budapest)
    1. Szücs, Géza (Debrecen)
    1. Telegdy, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Toldi, József (Szeged)
    1. Tósaki, Árpád (Debrecen)

International Editorial Board

    1. R. Bauer (Jena)
    1. W. Benjelloun (Rabat)
    1. A. W. Cowley Jr. (Milwaukee)
    1. D. Djuric (Belgrade)
    1. C. Fry (London)
    1. S. Greenwald (London)
    1. O. Hänninen (Kuopio)
    1. H. G. Hinghofer-Szalkay (Graz)
    1. Th. Kenner (Graz)
    1. Gy. Kunos (Richmond)
    1. M. Mahmoudian (Tehran)
    1. T. Mano (Seki, Gifu)
    1. G. Navar (New Orleans)
    1. H. Nishino (Nagoya)
    1. O. Petersen (Liverpool)
    1. U. Pohl (Münich)
    1. R. S. Reneman (Maastricht)
    1. A. Romanovsky (Phoenix)
    1. G. M. Rubanyi (Richmond)
    1. T. Sakata (Oita)
    1. A. Siddiqui (Karachi)
    1. Cs. Szabo (Beverly)
    1. E. Vicaut (Paris)
    1. N. Westerhof (Amsterdam)
    1. L. F. Zhang (Xi'an)

Editorial Office:
Akadémiai Kiadó Zrt.
Prielle Kornélia u. 21–35, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary

Editorial Correspondence:
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Semmelweis University, Faculty of Medicine Institute of Pathophysiology
Nagyvárad tér 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary
Phone/Fax: +36-1-2100-100
E-mail: aph@semmelweis-univ.hu

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
1950
Publication
Programme
changed title
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0231-424X (Print)
ISSN 1588-2683 (Online)

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