Authors:
Tadaaki Mano Gifu University of Medical Science Seki, Gifu 501-3892 Japan

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N. Nishimura Aichi Medical University Department of Physiology Nagakute, Aichi 485-1195 Japan

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S. Iwase Aichi Medical University Department of Physiology Nagakute, Aichi 485-1195 Japan

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Bone loss is one of the most important complications for astronauts who are exposed to long-term microgravity in space and also for bedridden elderly people. Recent studies have indicated that the sympathetic nervous system plays a role in bone metabolism. This paper reviews findings concerning with sympathetic influences on bone metabolism to hypothesize the mechanism how sympathetic neural functions are related to bone loss in microgravity. Animal studies have suggested that leptin stimulates hypothalamus increasing sympathetic outflow to bone and enhances bone resorption through noradrenaline and β-adrenoreceptors in bone. In humans, even though there have been some controversial findings, use of β-adrenoblockers has been reported to be beneficial for prevention of osteoporosis and bone fracture. On the other hand, microneurographically-recorded sympathetic nerve activity was enhanced by exposure to microgravity in space as well as dry immersion or long-term bed rest to simulate microgravity. The same sympathetic activity became higher in elderly people whose bone mass becomes generally reduced. Our recent findings indicated a significant correlation between muscle sympathetic nerve activity and urinary deoxypyridinoline as a specific marker measuring bone resorption. Based on these findings we would like to propose a following hypothesis concerning the sympathetic involvement in the mechanism of bone loss in microgravity: An exposure to prolonged microgravity may enhance sympathetic neural traffic not only to muscle but also to bone. This sympathetic enhancement increases plasma noradrenaline level and inhibits osteogenesis and facilitates bone resorption through β-adrenoreceptors in bone to facilitate bone resorption to reduce bone mass. The use of β-adrenoblockers to prevent bone loss in microgravity may be reasonable.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Rosivall, László

Honorary Editor(s)-in-Chief): Monos, Emil

Managing Editor(s): Bartha, Jenő; Berhidi, Anna

Co-editor(s): Koller, Ákos; Lénárd, László; Szénási, Gábor

Assistant Editor(s): G. Dörnyei (Budapest), Zs. Miklós (Budapest), Gy. Nádasy (Budapest)

Hungarian Editorial Board

    1. Benedek, György (Szeged)
    1. Benyó, Zoltán (Budapest)
    1. Boros, Mihály (Szeged)
    1. Chernoch, László (Debrecen)
    1. Détári, László (Budapest)
    1. Hamar, János (Budapest)
    1. Hantos, Zoltán (Szeged)
    1. Hunyady, László (Budapest)
    1. Imre, Sándor (Debrecen)
    1. Jancsó, Gábor (Szeged)
    1. Karádi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Kovács, László (Debrecen)
    1. Palkovits, Miklós (Budapest)
    1. Papp, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Pavlik, Gábor (Budapest)
    1. Spät, András (Budapest)
    1. Szabó, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Szelényi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Szolcsányi, János (Pécs)
    1. Szollár, Lajos (Budapest)
    1. Szücs, Géza (Debrecen)
    1. Telegdy, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Toldi, József (Szeged)
    1. Tósaki, Árpád (Debrecen)

International Editorial Board

    1. R. Bauer (Jena)
    1. W. Benjelloun (Rabat)
    1. A. W. Cowley Jr. (Milwaukee)
    1. D. Djuric (Belgrade)
    1. C. Fry (London)
    1. S. Greenwald (London)
    1. O. Hänninen (Kuopio)
    1. H. G. Hinghofer-Szalkay (Graz)
    1. Th. Kenner (Graz)
    1. Gy. Kunos (Richmond)
    1. M. Mahmoudian (Tehran)
    1. T. Mano (Seki, Gifu)
    1. G. Navar (New Orleans)
    1. H. Nishino (Nagoya)
    1. O. Petersen (Liverpool)
    1. U. Pohl (Münich)
    1. R. S. Reneman (Maastricht)
    1. A. Romanovsky (Phoenix)
    1. G. M. Rubanyi (Richmond)
    1. T. Sakata (Oita)
    1. A. Siddiqui (Karachi)
    1. Cs. Szabo (Beverly)
    1. E. Vicaut (Paris)
    1. N. Westerhof (Amsterdam)
    1. L. F. Zhang (Xi'an)

Editorial Office:
Akadémiai Kiadó Zrt.
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Editorial Correspondence:
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Semmelweis University, Faculty of Medicine Institute of Pathophysiology
Nagyvárad tér 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary
Phone/Fax: +36-1-2100-100
E-mail: aph@semmelweis-univ.hu

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
1950
Publication
Programme
changed title
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0231-424X (Print)
ISSN 1588-2683 (Online)

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