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  • 1 “Iuliu Haţieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Department of Physiology Cluj-Napoca Romania
  • | 2 University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Department of Morphopathology Cluj-Napoca Romania
  • | 3 “Iuliu Haţieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Surgery Department Cluj-Napoca Romania
  • | 4 University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Iuliu Hatieganu” Department of Physiology Cluj-Napoca Romania
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Oxidative stress is related to the liver fibrosis, anticipating the hepatic stellate cells’ (HSC) activation. Our aim was to correlate oxidative stress markers with the histological liver alterations in order to identify predictive, noninvasive parameters of fibrosis progression in the evolution of toxic hepatitis.CCl4 in sunflower oil was administered to rats intragastrically, twice a week. After 2, 3, 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PC), hydrogen donor capacity (HD), sulfhydryl groups (SH), and glutathione (GSH) were measured and histological examination of the liver slides was performed. Dynamics of histological disorders was assessed by The Knodell score. Significant elevation of inflammation grade was obtained after the second week of the experiment only (p=0.001), while fibrosis started to become significant (p=0.001) after 1 month of CCl4 administration. Between plasma MDA and liver fibrosis development a good correlation was obtained (r=0.877, p=0.05). Correlation between PC dynamics and liver alterations was marginally significant for inflammation grade (r=0.756, p=0.138). HD evolution revealed a marginally inverse correlation with inflammation grade (r=−0.794, p=0.108). No correlations could be established for other parameters with either inflammation grade or fibrosis stage.Our study shows that MDA elevation offers the best prediction potential for fibrosis, while marginal prediction fiability could be attributed to high levels of plasma PC and low levels of HD.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Rosivall, László

Honorary Editor(s)-in-Chief): Monos, Emil

Managing Editor(s): Bartha, Jenő; Berhidi, Anna

Co-editor(s): Koller, Ákos; Lénárd, László; Szénási, Gábor

Assistant Editor(s): G. Dörnyei (Budapest), Zs. Miklós (Budapest), Gy. Nádasy (Budapest)

Hungarian Editorial Board

      Benedek, György (Szeged)
      Benyó, Zoltán (Budapest)
      Boros, Mihály (Szeged)
      Chernoch, László (Debrecen)
      Détári, László (Budapest)
      Hamar, János (Budapest)
      Hantos, Zoltán (Szeged)
      Hunyady, László (Budapest)
      Imre, Sándor (Debrecen)
      Jancsó, Gábor (Szeged)
      Karádi, Zoltán (Pécs)
      Kovács, László (Debrecen)
      Palkovits, Miklós (Budapest)
      Papp, Gyula (Szeged)
      Pavlik, Gábor (Budapest)
      Spät, András (Budapest)
      Szabó, Gyula (Szeged)
      Szelényi, Zoltán (Pécs)
      Szolcsányi, János (Pécs)
      Szollár, Lajos (Budapest)
      Szücs, Géza (Debrecen)
      Telegdy, Gyula (Szeged)
      Toldi, József (Szeged)
      Tósaki, Árpád (Debrecen)

International Editorial Board

      R. Bauer (Jena)
      W. Benjelloun (Rabat)
      A. W. Cowley Jr. (Milwaukee)
      D. Djuric (Belgrade)
      C. Fry (London)
      S. Greenwald (London)
      O. Hänninen (Kuopio)
      H. G. Hinghofer-Szalkay (Graz)
      Th. Kenner (Graz)
      Gy. Kunos (Richmond)
      M. Mahmoudian (Tehran)
      T. Mano (Seki, Gifu)
      G. Navar (New Orleans)
      H. Nishino (Nagoya)
      O. Petersen (Liverpool)
      U. Pohl (Münich)
      R. S. Reneman (Maastricht)
      A. Romanovsky (Phoenix)
      G. M. Rubanyi (Richmond)
      T. Sakata (Oita)
      A. Siddiqui (Karachi)
      Cs. Szabo (Beverly)
      E. Vicaut (Paris)
      N. Westerhof (Amsterdam)
      L. F. Zhang (Xi'an)

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
1950
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changed title
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Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
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Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
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H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
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Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0231-424X (Print)
ISSN 1588-2683 (Online)

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