Authors:
K. Kumagai Nagasaki International University Sasebo Japan

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K. Kurobe National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya Kanoya Japan

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H. Zhong National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya Kanoya Japan

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J. Loenneke University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science Norman OK 73019 USA

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R. Thiebaud University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science Norman OK 73019 USA

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F. Ogita National Institute of Fitness and Sports in Kanoya Kanoya Japan

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Takashi Abe

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Previous studies reported that aerobic-type exercise such as walking or cycling with blood flow restriction (BFR) has been shown to elicit increases in leg muscle hypertrophy and strength, as well as improved aerobic capacity. Although previous studies investigated cardiovascular responses during a relatively short duration of exercise (∼5 min), the effects of prolonged leg muscular BFR have remained unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiovascular effects of longer duration low intensity exercise combined with BFR. Eight men performed 30 min of exercise at 40% of a predetermined maximal oxygen uptake under both BFR and normal flow (CON) conditions. Cardiovascular parameters were measured at rest and every 10 min during exercise. The main findings were that 1) the SV and HR did not change significantly between 10 to 30 min of exercise in BFR and CON conditions, although BFR-induced reduction of SV and increased HR were found at 10 min exercise compared with normal flow, 2) blood pressure was increased at 10 min of exercise in BFR compared to the CON, however the blood pressure decreased gradually with BFR from 10 to 30 min of exercise, and 3) blood lactate and RPE increased gradually during exercise with BFR. In conclusion, our results suggest that the BFR-induced reduction of SV and increased HR within the first 10 min of exercise are representative of changes in these parameters.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Rosivall, László

Honorary Editor(s)-in-Chief): Monos, Emil

Managing Editor(s): Bartha, Jenő; Berhidi, Anna

Co-editor(s): Koller, Ákos; Lénárd, László; Szénási, Gábor

Assistant Editor(s): G. Dörnyei (Budapest), Zs. Miklós (Budapest), Gy. Nádasy (Budapest)

Hungarian Editorial Board

    1. Benedek, György (Szeged)
    1. Benyó, Zoltán (Budapest)
    1. Boros, Mihály (Szeged)
    1. Chernoch, László (Debrecen)
    1. Détári, László (Budapest)
    1. Hamar, János (Budapest)
    1. Hantos, Zoltán (Szeged)
    1. Hunyady, László (Budapest)
    1. Imre, Sándor (Debrecen)
    1. Jancsó, Gábor (Szeged)
    1. Karádi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Kovács, László (Debrecen)
    1. Palkovits, Miklós (Budapest)
    1. Papp, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Pavlik, Gábor (Budapest)
    1. Spät, András (Budapest)
    1. Szabó, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Szelényi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Szolcsányi, János (Pécs)
    1. Szollár, Lajos (Budapest)
    1. Szücs, Géza (Debrecen)
    1. Telegdy, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Toldi, József (Szeged)
    1. Tósaki, Árpád (Debrecen)

International Editorial Board

    1. R. Bauer (Jena)
    1. W. Benjelloun (Rabat)
    1. A. W. Cowley Jr. (Milwaukee)
    1. D. Djuric (Belgrade)
    1. C. Fry (London)
    1. S. Greenwald (London)
    1. O. Hänninen (Kuopio)
    1. H. G. Hinghofer-Szalkay (Graz)
    1. Th. Kenner (Graz)
    1. Gy. Kunos (Richmond)
    1. M. Mahmoudian (Tehran)
    1. T. Mano (Seki, Gifu)
    1. G. Navar (New Orleans)
    1. H. Nishino (Nagoya)
    1. O. Petersen (Liverpool)
    1. U. Pohl (Münich)
    1. R. S. Reneman (Maastricht)
    1. A. Romanovsky (Phoenix)
    1. G. M. Rubanyi (Richmond)
    1. T. Sakata (Oita)
    1. A. Siddiqui (Karachi)
    1. Cs. Szabo (Beverly)
    1. E. Vicaut (Paris)
    1. N. Westerhof (Amsterdam)
    1. L. F. Zhang (Xi'an)

Editorial Office:
Akadémiai Kiadó Zrt.
Prielle Kornélia u. 21–35, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary

Editorial Correspondence:
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Semmelweis University, Faculty of Medicine Institute of Pathophysiology
Nagyvárad tér 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary
Phone/Fax: +36-1-2100-100
E-mail: aph@semmelweis-univ.hu

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
1950
Publication
Programme
changed title
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0231-424X (Print)
ISSN 1588-2683 (Online)

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