Authors:
Jeremy Loenneke
,
C. Fahs University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science, Neuromuscular Research Laboratory Norman OK USA

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R. Thiebaud University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science, Neuromuscular Research Laboratory Norman OK USA

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L. Rossow University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science, Neuromuscular Research Laboratory Norman OK USA

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T. Abe University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science, Neuromuscular Research Laboratory Norman OK USA

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Xin Ye University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science, Neuromuscular Research Laboratory Norman OK USA

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D. Kim University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science, Neuromuscular Research Laboratory Norman OK USA

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M. Bemben University of Oklahoma Department of Health and Exercise Science, Neuromuscular Research Laboratory Norman OK USA

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The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential mechanisms behind the blood flow restriction (BFR) stimulus in the absence of exercise. Nine participants completed a 10 minute time control and then a BFR protocol. The protocol was five, 5-minute bouts of inflation with 3-minutes of deflation between each bout. The pressure was set relative to each individual’s thigh circumference. Significant increases in muscle thickness were observed for both the vastus lateralis (VL) [6%, p = 0.027] and rectus femoris (RF) [22%, p = 0.001] along with a significant decrease in plasma volume [15%, p = 0.001]. Ratings of discomfort during the BFR protocol peaked at 2.7 (light discomfort). There were no significant changes with whole blood lactate, electromyography (EMG), or heart rate (HR), however, there was a trend for a significant increase in HR during the 5th inflation (p = 0.057). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that the attenuation of both muscle atrophy and declines in strength previously observed with brief applications of BFR may have been mediated through an acute fluid shift induced increase in muscle size. This is supported by our finding that the changes in muscle thickness are maintained even after the cuffs have been removed.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Rosivall, László

Honorary Editor(s)-in-Chief): Monos, Emil

Managing Editor(s): Bartha, Jenő; Berhidi, Anna

Co-editor(s): Koller, Ákos; Lénárd, László; Szénási, Gábor

Assistant Editor(s): G. Dörnyei (Budapest), Zs. Miklós (Budapest), Gy. Nádasy (Budapest)

Hungarian Editorial Board

    1. Benedek, György (Szeged)
    1. Benyó, Zoltán (Budapest)
    1. Boros, Mihály (Szeged)
    1. Chernoch, László (Debrecen)
    1. Détári, László (Budapest)
    1. Hamar, János (Budapest)
    1. Hantos, Zoltán (Szeged)
    1. Hunyady, László (Budapest)
    1. Imre, Sándor (Debrecen)
    1. Jancsó, Gábor (Szeged)
    1. Karádi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Kovács, László (Debrecen)
    1. Palkovits, Miklós (Budapest)
    1. Papp, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Pavlik, Gábor (Budapest)
    1. Spät, András (Budapest)
    1. Szabó, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Szelényi, Zoltán (Pécs)
    1. Szolcsányi, János (Pécs)
    1. Szollár, Lajos (Budapest)
    1. Szücs, Géza (Debrecen)
    1. Telegdy, Gyula (Szeged)
    1. Toldi, József (Szeged)
    1. Tósaki, Árpád (Debrecen)

International Editorial Board

    1. R. Bauer (Jena)
    1. W. Benjelloun (Rabat)
    1. A. W. Cowley Jr. (Milwaukee)
    1. D. Djuric (Belgrade)
    1. C. Fry (London)
    1. S. Greenwald (London)
    1. O. Hänninen (Kuopio)
    1. H. G. Hinghofer-Szalkay (Graz)
    1. Th. Kenner (Graz)
    1. Gy. Kunos (Richmond)
    1. M. Mahmoudian (Tehran)
    1. T. Mano (Seki, Gifu)
    1. G. Navar (New Orleans)
    1. H. Nishino (Nagoya)
    1. O. Petersen (Liverpool)
    1. U. Pohl (Münich)
    1. R. S. Reneman (Maastricht)
    1. A. Romanovsky (Phoenix)
    1. G. M. Rubanyi (Richmond)
    1. T. Sakata (Oita)
    1. A. Siddiqui (Karachi)
    1. Cs. Szabo (Beverly)
    1. E. Vicaut (Paris)
    1. N. Westerhof (Amsterdam)
    1. L. F. Zhang (Xi'an)

Editorial Office:
Akadémiai Kiadó Zrt.
Prielle Kornélia u. 21–35, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary

Editorial Correspondence:
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Semmelweis University, Faculty of Medicine Institute of Pathophysiology
Nagyvárad tér 4, H-1089 Budapest, Hungary
Phone/Fax: +36-1-2100-100
E-mail: aph@semmelweis-univ.hu

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
1950
Publication
Programme
changed title
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0231-424X (Print)
ISSN 1588-2683 (Online)

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