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  • 1 Safiabad Agricultural Research and Education and Natural Resources Center, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization (AREEO), Dezful, Iran
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The northern of Khuzestan province in Iran is mainly considered as one of the major areas of miniature rose production. Blossom blight caused by Botrytis cinerea has recently become a serious limiting factor in rose production in pre and post-harvest. In current study, an attempt was made to evaluate the inhibitory potential of some local Trichoderma spp. strains against B. cinerea under in vitro and in vivo conditions. The in vitro results showed that all Trichoderma spp. strains were significantly able to reduce the mycelial growth of the pathogen in dual culture, volatile and non-volatile compounds tests compared with control, with superiority of T. atroviride Tsafi than others. Under in vivo condition, the selected strain of T. atroviride Tsafi had much better performance than T. harzianum IRAN 523C in reduction of disease severity compared with the untreated control. Overall, the findings of this study showed that the application of Trichoderma-based biocontrol agents such as T. atroviride Tsafi can be effective to protect cut rose flowers against blossom blight.

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