View More View Less
  • 1 Ghent University, Blandijnberg 2, B9000 Ghent, Belgium
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $25.00

1 year subscription (Individual Only)

USD  $624.00

One of the most visible identity markers of Buddhist monasticism is clothing. The robes of monks and nuns have been paid considerable attention by researchers. By contrast, other pieces of monastic clothing have attracted far less attention, and this is particularly the case with footwear. Although shoes certainly play a secondary role compared to robes, they still present the monastic community with a number of complex issues. Shoes touch the ground, so they inevitably get dirty. Hence, wearing shoes could be considered disrespectful when meeting someone or paying homage, but so could showing one’s naked feet. Meanwhile, shoes protect the feet from dirt and injury on difficult roads, so they may be viewed as essential attire. Additional issues relate to the material and the shape of the footwear, and which shoes are the most appropriate in various situations. This study discusses early Buddhist disciplinary (vinaya) texts’ guidelines on issues relating to footwear, and explores how these guidelines were later received within China. It also provides a detailed picture of early Indian and Chinese Buddhist communities’ attitudes to shoes, a problematic element of monastic clothing.

  • Ciyi 慈怡 (ed.) (1989): Foguang da cidian 佛光大辭典. Gaoxiong, Foguang Chubanshe. Reprint: Beijing, Beijing tushuguan chubanshe.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Clarke, Shayne (2004): Vinaya Mātṛkā–Mother of the Monastic Codes, or just Another Set of Lists? A Response to Frauwallner’s Handling of the Mahāsāṃghika Vinaya. Indo-Iranian Journal Vol. 47, pp. 77120.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Clarke, Shayne (2014): Family Matters in Indian Buddhist Monasticisms. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press.

  • Collins, Steven (1997): The Body in Theravāda Buddhist Monasticism. In: Coakley, Sarah (ed.): Religion and the Body. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, pp. 194203.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DeMello, Margo (2009): Feet and Footwear: A Cultural Encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, Calif., Greenwood Press.

  • Duan Wenjie 段文傑 (ed.) (1993): Dunhuang shique yishu, Yulin ku di erwu ku fu di yiwu ku (Zhong Tang) 敦煌石窟藝術, 榆林窟第二五窟附第一五窟 (中唐) [Dunhuang cave art, Yulin cave 25, with some additions of cave 15 (Middle Tang)]. Nanjing, Jiangsu meishu chubanshe.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Frauwallner, Erich (1956): The Earliest Vinaya and the Beginnings of Buddhist Literature. Roma, Istituto Italiano per il Medio ed Estremo Oriente.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Fritz, Claudia (1994): Die Verwaltungsstruktur der Chan-Klöster in der späten Yuan-Zeit, Das 4. Buch der Chixiu Baizhang qinggui, übersetzt, annotiert und mit einer Einleitung versehen. Bern, Peter Lang.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Funayama, Tōru (2004): The Acceptance of Buddhist Precepts by the Chinese in the Fifth Century. Journal of Asian History Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 97120.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gombrich, Richard (2009): What the Buddha Thought. London, Equinox.

  • Guo Huizhen 郭慧珍 (2001): Hanzu fojiao sengjia fuzhuang zhi yanjiu 漢族佛教僧伽服裝之研究 [A study on monastic clothing in Chinese Buddhism]. Taipei, Fagu wenhua.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Heirman, Ann (2002): ‘The Discipline in Four Parts’, Rules for Nuns According to the Dharmaguptakavinaya. 3 vols. Delhi, Motilal Banarsidass.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Heirman, Ann (2007): Vinaya from India to China. In: Heirman, AnnBumbacher, Stephan-Peter (eds): The Spread of Buddhism. Leiden, Brill, pp. 167202.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Heirman, Ann (2008): Indian Disciplinary Rules and Their Early Chinese Adepts: A Buddhist Reality. Journal of the American Oriental Society Vol. 128, No. 2, pp. 257272.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Heirman, Ann (2012): Sleep well! Sleeping Practices in Buddhist Disciplinary Rules. AOH Vol. 65, No. 4, pp. 427444.

  • Heirman, Ann (2014): Washing and Dyeing Buddhist Monastic Robes. AOH Vol. 67, No. 4, pp. 467488.

  • Heirman, AnnDe Rauw, Tom (2006): Offenders, Sinners and Criminals: The Consumption of Forbidden Food. AOH Vol. 59, No. 1, pp. 5783.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Heirman, AnnTorck, Mathieu (2012): A Pure Mind in a Clean Body: Bodily Care in the Buddhist Monasteries of Ancient India and China. Ghent, Academia Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hirakawa, Akira 平川彰 (1970): Ritsuzō no Kenkyū 律蔵の研究 [A study of the Vinaya-Piṭaka]. Tokyo, Sankibō Busshorin.

  • Horner, Isaline Blew (1938–1966): The Book of Discipline (Vinaya-Piṭaka). 6 vols. London, Pali Text Society.

  • Ichimura, Shohei (2006): The Baizhang Zen Monastic Regulations. Berkeley, Calif., Numata Center for Buddhist Translation and Research.

  • Kieschnick, John (1999): The Symbolism of the Monk’s Robe in China. Asia Major Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 932.

  • Kieschnick, John (2003): The Impact of Buddhism on Chinese Material Culture. Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press.

  • Kieschnick, John (2005): Buddhist Vegetarianism in China. In: Roel Sterckx (ed.): Of Tripod and Palate: Food, Politics, and Religion in Traditional China. New York, Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 186212.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Li, Rongxi (2000): Buddhist Monastic Traditions of Southern Asia: A Record of the Inner Law Sent Home from the South Seas. Berkeley, Calif., Numata Center for Buddhist Translation and Research.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Liu, Xinru (1996): Silk and Religion: An Exploration of Material Life and the Thought of People AD 600–1200. Delhi, Oxford University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Luo, Chongqi 骆崇骐 (1990): Zhongguo xie wenhua shi 中国鞋文化史 [The history of the culture of shoes in China]. Shanghai, Shanghai kexue jishu chubanshe.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Luo, Chongqi 骆崇骐 (2007): Zhongguo lidai xielü yanjiu yü jianshang 中国历代鞋履研究与鉴赏 [Study and appreciation of Chinese shoes in the past histories]. Shanghai, Donghua daxue chubanshe.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Luo, Chongqi 骆崇骐 (2014): Qutan Zhonghua xie shi 趣谈中华鞋史 [Discussion of the history of shoes in China]. Shanghai, Donghua daxue chubanshe.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Maes, Claire (2010–2011): One-Sensed Facultied Life (ekindriya jīva) in the Pāli vinaya: A Camouflaged Debate between Early Buddhists and Jains. Bulletin d’Études Indiennes Nos 28–29, pp. 85104.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Maes, Claire (2015): Dialogues with(in) the Pāli Vinaya: A Research into the Dynamics and Dialectics of the Pāli Vinaya’s Ascetic Others, with a Special Focus on the Jain Other. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, Ghent University.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mrozik, Suzanne (2007): Virtuous Bodies: The Physical Dimensions of Morality in Buddhist Ethics. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

  • Nakamura, Hajime (1985 [1981]): Bukkyōgo daijiten 佛教語大辞典 [Dictionary of Buddhist terms]. Tokyo, Tōkyō shoseki kabushiki kaisha.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Nattier, Jan (2003): A Few Good Men: The Bodhisattva Path According to The Inquiry of Ugra (Ugraparipṛcchā). Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Schlütter, Morten (2005): Vinaya Monasteries, Public Abbacies, and State Control of Buddhism under the Song (920–1279). In: Bodiford, William M. (ed.): Going Forth, Visions of Buddhist Vinaya: Essays Presented in Honor of Professor Stanley Weinstein. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, pp. 136160.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Schmithausen, Lambert (2009): Plants in Early Buddhism and the Far Eastern Idea of the Buddha-Nature of Grasses and Trees. Lumbini, Lumbini International Research Institute.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Schopen, Gregory (1997): Cross-dressing with the Dead: Asceticism, Ambivalence, and Institutional Values in an Indian Monastic Code. In: Cuevas, Bryan J.Stone, Jacqueline I. (eds): The Buddhist Dead: Practices, Discourses, Representations. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press, pp. 60104.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Tanaka, Yoko (2015): Embroidered Slippers in the Shōsōin Repository. In Stevenson, JohnDusenbury, Mary M.O’Neil Rife, Ellen (eds): Color in Ancient and Medieval East Asia. New Haven, Conn.–London, Yale University Press, pp. 142147.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Witkowski, Nicholas (2013): Pāṃśukūlika as a Standard Practice in the Vinaya. Paper presented at the Vinaya Conference, Hangzhou, China, 21–22 August.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Yifa (2002): The Origins of Buddhist Monastic Codes in China. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press.

  • Young, Stuart H. (2013): For a Compassionate Killing: Chinese Buddhism, Sericulture, and the Silkworm God Aśvaghoṣa. Journal of Chinese Religions Vol. 41, No. 1, pp. 2558.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Young, Stuart H. (2015): Conceiving the Indian Buddhist Patriarchs in China. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press.

  • Yuyama, Akira (1979): Systematische Übersicht über die buddhistische Sanskrit-Literatur, Erster Teil: Vinaya-Texte. Wiesbaden, Franz Steiner Verlag.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zamperini, Paola (2006): A Dream of Butterflies? Shoes in Chinese Culture. In: Riello, GiorgioMcNeil, Peter (eds): Shoes: A History from Sandals to Sneakers. Oxford–New York, Berg, pp. 196205.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

 

The author instruction is available in PDF.
Please, download the file from HERE.

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Gábor KÓSA

Editorial Board

  • Benedek PÉRI (Eötvös Loránd University)
  • Ágnes BIRTALAN (Eötvös Loránd University)
  • Csaba DEZSŐ (Eötvös Loránd University)
  • Bert FRAGNER (Austrian Academy of Sciences)
  • Peter B. GOLDEN (Rutgers University)
  • Imre HAMAR (Eötvös Loránd University)
  • Zoltán SZOMBATHY (Eötvös Loránd University)
  • István VÁSÁRY(Eötvös Loránd University)
  • Yutaka YOSHIDA (Kyoto University)
  • Peter ZIEME (Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities)

 

Dr. Gábor Kósa
Editor-in-Chief
Institute of East Asian Studies
Eötvös Loránd University
Múzeum krt. 4/F
H-1088 Budapest, Hungary
kosa.gabor@btk.elte.hu

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • Arts and Humanities Citation Index
  • Bibliographie Linguistique/Linguistic Bibliography
  • Historical Abstracts
  • International Bibliographies IBZ and IBR
  • MLA International Bibliography
  • SCOPUS

2020  
Scimago
H-index
6
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,1
Scimago
Quartile Score
Cultural Studies Q4
History Q4
Literature and Literary Theory Q4
Scopus
Cite Score
21/100=0,2
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Cultural Studies 664/1037 (Q3)
History 778/1328 (Q3)
Literature and Literary Theory 320/845 (Q2)
Scopus
SNIP
0,075
Scopus
Cites
43
Scopus
Documents
27
Days from submission to acceptance 238
Days from acceptance to publication 212
Acceptance
Rate
10%

 

2019  
Scimago
H-index
5
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,115
Scimago
Quartile Score
Cultural Studies Q3
History Q3
Literature and Literary Theory Q2
Scopus
Cite Score
32/92=0,3
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
Cultural Studies 460/1002 (Q2)
History 519/1259 (Q2)
Literature and Literary Theory 155/823 (Q1)
Scopus
SNIP
0,553
Scopus
Cites
39
Scopus
Documents
13
Acceptance
Rate
11%

 

Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Publication Model Hybrid
Submission Fee none
Article Processing Charge 900 EUR/article
Printed Color Illustrations 40 EUR (or 10 000 HUF) + VAT / piece
Regional discounts on country of the funding agency World Bank Lower-middle-income economies: 50%
World Bank Low-income economies: 100%
Further Discounts Editorial Board / Advisory Board members: 50%
Corresponding authors, affiliated to an EISZ member institution subscribing to the journal package of Akadémiai Kiadó: 100%
Subscription fee 2021 Online subsscription: 520 EUR / 652 USD
Print + online subscription: 608 EUR / 760 USD
Subscription fee 2022 Online subsscription: 532 EUR / 668 USD
Print + online subscription: 620 EUR / 776 USD
Subscription Information Online subscribers are entitled access to all back issues published by Akadémiai Kiadó for each title for the duration of the subscription, as well as Online First content for the subscribed content.
Purchase per Title Individual articles are sold on the displayed price.

Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
1950
Publication
Programme
2021 Volume 74
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
4
Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia
Founder's
Address
H-1051 Budapest, Hungary, Széchenyi István tér 9.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0001-6446 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2667 (Online)