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  • 1 Central Food Research Institute; Department of Refrigeration and Livestock Products' Technology, Corvinus University of Budapest H-1022 Budapest, Herman Ottó út 15. Hungary; H-1118 Budapest, Ménesi út 45. Hungary
  • | 2 Central Food Research Institute; Department of Refrigeration and Livestock Products' Technology, Corvinus University of Budapest H-1022 Budapest, Herman Ottó út 15. Hungary; H-1118 Budapest, Ménesi út 45. Hungary
  • | 3 Department of Refrigeration and Livestock Products' Technology, Corvinus University of Budapest H-1118 Budapest, Ménesi út 45. Hungary
  • | 4 Department of Refrigeration and Livestock Products' Technology, Corvinus University of Budapest H-1118 Budapest, Ménesi út 45. Hungary
  • | 5 Department of Refrigeration and Livestock Products' Technology, Corvinus University of Budapest H-1118 Budapest, Ménesi út 45. Hungary
  • | 6 National Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition H-1097 Budapest, Gyáli út 3/a. Hungary
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Experiments were performed to study changes caused by irradiation or high hydrostatic pressure pasteurization of liquid egg white by differential scanning calorimetry, spectrofluorimetry, electronic nose measurements and NIR-spectrometry. The non-thermal pasteurization treatments were also assessed in relation to loss of carotenoid content, and lipid- and cholesterol oxidation of liquid egg yolk. Unlike radiation pasteurization, high pressure processing caused protein denaturation in egg white, which manifested in changes of its DSC-thermogram and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Electronic nose testing showed changes of the head-space volatile composition of egg albumen, particularly as a function of radiation treatment. Both treatments caused changes in the NIR-spectrometric “fingerprint” of the liquid egg white. Various chemometric analyses of the results of the latter instrumental methods, particularly statistical techniques developed by the group of one of the co-authors of this article, demonstrated the potential for detection and characterization of the applied non-thermal processing techniques on liquid egg white. Irradiation induced more carotenoid degradation and lipid oxidation in liquid egg yolk than pressure processing.

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