Authors:
X. Liu School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Biorefinery, Guangzhou, China

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Y. Li School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China

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J. Chen School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China

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D. He School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Biorefinery, Guangzhou, China

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H. Li School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China

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K. Wu School of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Biorefinery, Guangzhou, China

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Abstract

This paper provides a rapid method coupled with chemometrics to visualise PEL quality of eight regions. The contents of mineral elements, Vitamin C (Vc), and colour parameters were measured using spectrophotometric methods. The volatile substances were determined by electronic nose (E-nose) and headspace solid phase micro-extraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS). Chemometric analyses were employed to visualise the sample distribution according to the geographical origin. The colour parameters, Vc, and mineral contents of PEL from diverse origins were significantly different (P < 0.05). A total of 25 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified from PELs, with the highest percentage of components being ethyl acetate. The combination of HS-SPME/GC-MS and E-nose can properly characterise PEL samples. Therefore, the results of this exploratory work highlight the possibility of discriminating PEL from different regions.

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  • Sharma, R., Burang, G., Kumar, S., Sharma, Y.P., and Kumar, V. (2022). Optimization of apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) blended Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis M.) based low-calorie beverage functionally enriched with aonla juice (Phyllanthus emblica L.). Journal of Food Science and Technology, 59: 20132024.

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  • Wu, J., Liu, Y., Zhao, H., Huang, M., Sun, Y., Zhang, J., and Sun, B. (2021). Recent advances in the understanding of off-flavors in alcoholic beverages: generation, regulation, and challenges. Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, 103: 104117.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: András Salgó

Co-ordinating Editor(s) Marianna Tóth-Markus

Co-editor(s): A. Halász

       Editorial Board

  • L. Abrankó (Szent István University, Gödöllő, Hungary)
  • D. Bánáti (University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary)
  • J. Baranyi (Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK)
  • I. Bata-Vidács (Agro-Environmental Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • F. Békés (FBFD PTY LTD, Sydney, NSW Australia)
  • Gy. Biró (National Institute for Food and Nutrition Science, Budapest, Hungary)
  • A. Blázovics (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • F. Capozzi (University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy)
  • M. Carcea (Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics Rome, Italy)
  • Zs. Cserhalmi (Food Science Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • M. Dalla Rosa (University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy)
  • I. Dalmadi (Szent István University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • K. Demnerova (University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic)
  • M. Dobozi King (Texas A&M University, Texas, USA)
  • Muying Du (Southwest University in Chongqing, Chongqing, China)
  • S. N. El (Ege University, Izmir, Turkey)
  • S. B. Engelsen (University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark)
  • E. Gelencsér (Food Science Research Institute, National Agricultural Research and Innovation Centre, Budapest, Hungary)
  • V. M. Gómez-López (Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, Murcia, Spain)
  • J. Hardi (University of Osijek, Osijek, Croatia)
  • H. He (Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Xinxiang, China)
  • K. Héberger (Research Centre for Natural Sciences, ELKH, Budapest, Hungary)
  • N. Ilić (University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia)
  • D. Knorr (Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany)
  • H. Köksel (Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey)
  • K. Liburdi (Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy)
  • M. Lindhauer (Max Rubner Institute, Detmold, Germany)
  • M.-T. Liong (Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia)
  • M. Manley (Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa)
  • M. Mézes (Szent István University, Gödöllő, Hungary)
  • Á. Németh (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • P. Ng (Michigan State University,  Michigan, USA)
  • Q. D. Nguyen (Szent István University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • L. Nyström (ETH Zürich, Switzerland)
  • L. Perez (University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain)
  • V. Piironen (University of Helsinki, Finland)
  • A. Pino (University of Catania, Catania, Italy)
  • M. Rychtera (University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Czech Republic)
  • K. Scherf (Technical University, Munich, Germany)
  • R. Schönlechner (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria)
  • A. Sharma (Department of Atomic Energy, Delhi, India)
  • A. Szarka (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • M. Szeitzné Szabó (National Food Chain Safety Office, Budapest, Hungary)
  • S. Tömösközi (Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary)
  • L. Varga (University of West Hungary, Mosonmagyaróvár, Hungary)
  • R. Venskutonis (Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania)
  • B. Wróblewska (Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences Olsztyn, Poland)

 

Acta Alimentaria
E-mail: Acta.Alimentaria@uni-mate.hu

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Acta Alimentaria
Language English
Size B5
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1972
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Founder Magyar Tudományos Akadémia    
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ISSN 0139-3006 (Print)
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