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Abstract

This paper tests Tirkkonen-Condit's (2004) Unique Item (UI) Hypothesis, which claims that UI are under-represented in translated texts and, on the other hand, Baker's (1993) Simplification Hypothesis and Halverson's (2003) Gravitational Pull Hypothesis, which predict over-representation of UI in translated texts. These hypotheses are contrasted by comparing the presence of English self-directed motion in English texts translated from Spanish from the Translational English Corpus (TEC, Baker 2003) and texts spontaneously produced in English from the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA, Davies 2008). Self-directed motion expressions are employed because of their linguistic divergences in English and Spanish. Twenty-eight English manner-of-motion verbs and eight English path-denoting satellites were selected to compare the number of self-directed motion expressions in the TEC and the COCA. This study yielded a total of 41,852 tokens from both corpora, that is, 209.2 expressions per million words in the TEC and 395.5 expressions per million words in the COCA. An independent samples t-test revealed that the number of expressions is significantly higher in the COCA (M = 3.32) than in the TEC (M = 1.76). A two-way ANOVA revealed significant main effects for Corpus and Lexical Frequency, but no Corpus*Lexical Frequency interaction effect was found. These results support Tirkkonen-Condit's UI Hypothesis and confirm that non-translated English is significantly richer in self-directed motion expressions than translated (from Spanish) English.

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  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 11
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q1 Linguistics and Language
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q1 Language and Linguistics

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Klaudy, Kinga

Managing Editor(s): Károly, Krisztina

Consulting Editor(s): Heltai, Pál

Editorial Board

      Jettmarová, Zuzana
      Pym, Anthony
      Snell-Hornby, Mary
      Tirkkonen-Condit, Sonja

Advisory Board

      Baker, Mona
      Chesterman, Andrew
      Corpas Pastor, Gloria
      Dimitriu, Rodica
      Dollerup, Cay
      Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
      Gentzler, Edwin
      Gottlieb, Henrik
      Kalina, Sylvia
      Kierzkowska, Danuta
      Király, Donald
      Kurz, Ingrid
      Laviosa Sara
      Nord, Christiane
      Prószéky, Gábor
      Riccardi, Alessandra
      Robin, Edina
      Salama-Carr, Myriam
      Sohár, Anikó
      Ulrych, Margherita
      Vermes, Albert

Prof. Kinga Klaudy
Eötvös Loránd University, Department of Translation and Interpreting
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