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  • 1 School of English Adam Mickiewicz University Department of Translation Studies al. Niepodleglosci 4. 61-874 Poznan Poland
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Simultaneous interpreting (SI) is a cognitively demanding task. This is why there are typically two interpreters working in a booth and taking turns every 30 minutes or so. Interpreters work in pairs not only to be able to overcome fatigue, but also to cooperate and help each other. This article is an attempt to shed some light on the process of booth teamwork. Cooperation in the booth is examined in the professional context, which leads to conclusions regarding the incorporation of this skill in conference interpreter training.A survey was conducted among 200 free-lance interpreters associated in AIIC and working on various markets to find out more about their expectations and needs as regards assistance from their booth partners. The respondents were asked about their mode of operation, activities in the booth when off-mike and their perception of the need to teach cooperation to interpretation trainees. It turns out that there are some factors that may impede teamwork in the simultaneous interpreting booth. Interpreters who are off-mike can engage in last-minute preparation using materials supplied by the organizers shortly before the commencement of a conference. Additionally, fatigue may prevent them from actively listening to the input and assisting their boothmate. The results of the survey may help answer the question if teamwork and turn-taking should be part of simultaneous interpreting courses.

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  • Impact Factor (2019): 0.360
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2019): 0.648
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2019): 13
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q1 Linguistics and Language
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q1 Language and Linguistics
  • Impact Factor (2018): 1.16
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2018): 0.683
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 11
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q1 Linguistics and Language
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q1 Language and Linguistics

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Klaudy, Kinga

Managing Editor(s): Károly, Krisztina

Consulting Editor(s): Heltai, Pál

Editorial Board

      Jettmarová, Zuzana
      Pym, Anthony
      Snell-Hornby, Mary
      Tirkkonen-Condit, Sonja

Advisory Board

      Baker, Mona
      Chesterman, Andrew
      Corpas Pastor, Gloria
      Dimitriu, Rodica
      Dollerup, Cay
      Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
      Gentzler, Edwin
      Gottlieb, Henrik
      Kalina, Sylvia
      Kierzkowska, Danuta
      Király, Donald
      Kurz, Ingrid
      Laviosa Sara
      Nord, Christiane
      Prószéky, Gábor
      Riccardi, Alessandra
      Robin, Edina
      Salama-Carr, Myriam
      Sohár, Anikó
      Ulrych, Margherita
      Vermes, Albert

Prof. Kinga Klaudy
Eötvös Loránd University, Department of Translation and Interpreting
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