Authors:
G. Riise Agriculture University of Norway Isotope and Electron Microscopy Laboratories P.O. Box 26 N-1432 Aas-NLH (Norway)

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H. Bjørnstad Agriculture University of Norway Isotope and Electron Microscopy Laboratories P.O. Box 26 N-1432 Aas-NLH (Norway)

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H. Lien Agriculture University of Norway Isotope and Electron Microscopy Laboratories P.O. Box 26 N-1432 Aas-NLH (Norway)

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D. Oughton University of Manchester Department of Chemistry Manchester (England)

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B. Salbu Agriculture University of Norway Isotope and Electron Microscopy Laboratories P.O. Box 26 N-1432 Aas-NLH (Norway)

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Abstract  

Measurements performed in 1986–1988 demonstrate that most of the radiocesium isotopes (137Cs and134Cs) deposited after the Chernobyl accident are still located in the upper soil layers (0–2 cm). The vertical migration appears to be slow, and only a small fraction of the radiocesium has been transferred into the biological cycle. Sequential extraction techniques have been utilized in order to investigate the degree of binding or association between deposited radionuclides (137Cs,134Cs and90Sr) and components in soil. The results indicate that a major fraction of the radiocesium is associated strongly with organic and mineral materials in the litter or upper soil layers: less than 10% is easily leachable. The distribution of137Cs throughout the fractions was similar to that determined for naturally occurring stable cesium (133Cs), implying that isotopic exchange had been extensive. For90Sr, the results show a relatively high leachable fraction. Therefore, present results indicate that radiocesium should be less mobile, and less available for root uptake, than90Sr in soil.

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Journal of Radionalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1968
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
12
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 0236-5731 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2780 (Online)