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  • 1 Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Ghent University, Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 904, 9052, Ghent, Belgium
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Abstract

The hydration of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) blended with blast-furnace slag (BFS) is a complex process since both materials have their own reactions which are, however, influenced by each other. Moreover, the effect of the slag on the hydration process is still not entirely known and little research concerning the separation of both reactions can be found in the literature. Therefore, this article presents an investigation of the hydration process of mixes in which 0–85% of the OPC is replaced by BFS. At early ages, isothermal, semi-adiabatic and adiabatic calorimetric measurements were performed to determine the heat of hydration. At later ages, thermogravimetric (TG) analyses are more suitable to follow up the hydration by assessment of the bound water content wb. In addition, the microstructure development was visualized by backscattered electron (BSE) microscopy. Isothermal calorimetric test results show an enhancement of the cement hydration and an additional hydration peak in the presence of BFS, whilst (semi-)adiabatic calorimetric measurements clearly indicate a decreasing temperature rise with increasing BFS content. Based on the cumulative heat production curves, the OPC and BFS reactions were separated to determine the reaction degree Q(t)/Q (Q = cumulative heat production) of the cement, slag and total binder. Moreover, thermogravimetry also allowed to calculate the reaction degree by wb(t)/wb∞. The reaction degrees wb(t)/wb∞, Q(t)/Q and the hydration degrees determined by BSE-image analysis showed quite good correspondence.

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Manuscript Submission: HERE

  • Impact Factor (2019): 2.731
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2019): 0.415
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2019): 87
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Impact Factor (2018): 2.471
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2018): 0.634
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 78
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1969
Volumes
per Year
4
Issues
per Year
24
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1388-6150 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2926 (Online)