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  • 1 Engineering Sciences Center, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87105, USA
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Abstract

Determining the response of composite phenolic materials to fire remains a major unsolved problem that is important for high consequence safety analysis. Difficulties arise when thermophysical property measurements are obscured by decomposition reactions. This article presents several decomposition experiments and models for a phenolic resin impregnated into chopped 1.27-by-1.27 cm glass fabric. The thermal response of the material was measured using thermogravimetric analysis (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and laser flash diffusivity (LFD). The TG data was used to develop a 5-step decomposition mechanism describing mass loss due to reaction; the DSC data was used to describe the energy changes associated with these reactions; and the LFD data was used to describe energy flow into the decomposing material. An effective thermal conductivity model was used to partition energy transport by gas conduction, solid conduction, and diffusive radiation. The dynamic gas volume fraction is treated as a field variable to extrapolate thermal transport properties at high temperatures where decomposition is prevalent. These various models have been implemented into a finite element response model with an example calculation that includes uncertainty.

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Manuscript Submission: HERE

  • Impact Factor (2019): 2.731
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2019): 0.415
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2019): 87
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Impact Factor (2018): 2.471
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2018): 0.634
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 78
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1969
Volumes
per Year
4
Issues
per Year
24
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1388-6150 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2926 (Online)