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  • 1 Département Procédés Propres et Environnement, Laboratoire de Modélisation, Mécanique et Procédés Propres UMR CNRS 6181, Europôle de l'Arbois-Bâtiment Laennec-Hall C, BP 80–13545, Aix en Provence, France
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Abstract

In wastewater treatment by constructed wetland, the biodegradation capability of the biomass developed in the soil is one of the most important factors. For this kind of treatment unit, soil properties are studied to improve its filtration capacity and hydraulic residence time of the wastewater. The impact of soil properties like porosity and soil components on biomass development and biodegradation capacity seem to be less studied certainly due to the complexity of microbial identification techniques currently used. The study presented here is a preliminary work to validate that calorimetric technique could be a tool in the understanding of biodegradation capacity of wastewater treatment processes. Biofilm is preliminary developed in columns filled with different porous materials of well known porosity and constitutive components. These columns are fed with the same continuous flow of synthetic solution (C, N, and P) as a substrate amending during 3 weeks. Then each week, 2 mL samples of porous media from these columns are analyzed in isothermal calorimeter for 48 h. Net heat flow is recorded before and after substrate injection. This work results in the definition of the procedure for batch experiments in calorimeter for wastewater process efficiency. The results of these experiments show that the microbial reaction due to substrate amendment is highly depending on the porous material used for biofilm growth. Indeed calorimetric signals recorded lead to conclude that biofilm grown on plastic beads has a faster and more intensive reaction to glucose amendment than biofilm grown on glass beads. At least, two glass beads samples analyzed in the calorimeter after the same duration of feeding with synthetic solution have very different response to glucose or synthetic solution.

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Manuscript Submission: HERE

  • Impact Factor (2019): 2.731
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2019): 0.415
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2019): 87
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Impact Factor (2018): 2.471
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2018): 0.634
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 78
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1969
Volumes
per Year
4
Issues
per Year
24
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1388-6150 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2926 (Online)