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  • 1 Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Szeged, Eötvös u. 6, Szeged H-6720, Hungary
  • 2 Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Târgu Mures, Marinescu Str. 38, 540139, Targu-Mures, Romania
  • 3 Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, Aradi Vértanúk tere 1, Szeged H-6720, Hungary
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Abstract

The compatibility of aceclofenac with various tableting excipients was investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The excipients applied in the direct pressing retard tablets were Carbopol 940, hydroxypropyl-methyl-cellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, Aerosil 200 and magnesium stearate. The ingredients alone and their 1:1 (w/w) binary mixtures were investigated before and after accelerated storage. An interaction was observed only between aceclofenac and magnesium stearate. The DSC and FT-IR examinations indicated formation of the magnesium salt of aceclofenac. For the other mixtures, there was no incompatibility between the components.

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  • Impact Factor (2019): 2.731
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2019): 0.415
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2019): 87
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Impact Factor (2018): 2.471
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2018): 0.634
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 78
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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