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  • 1 Key Laboratory of Specially Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
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Abstract

To optimize the hydration process of blended cement, cement clinker and supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) were ground and classified into several fractions. Early hydration process of each cementitious materials fraction was investigated by isothermal calorimeter. The results show fine cement clinker fractions show very high hydration rate, which leads to high water requirement, while fine SCMs fractions present relatively high hydration (or pozzolanic reaction) rate. Cement clinker fractions in the range of 8–24 μm show proper hydration rate in early ages and continue to hydrate rapidly afterward. Coarse cement clinker fractions largely play “filling effect” and make little contribution to the properties of blended cement regardless of their hydration activity (or pozzolanic activity). The hydration process of blended cement can be optimized by arranging high activity SCMs, cement clinker, and low activity SCMs in fine, middle, and coarse fractions, respectively, which not only results in reduced water requirement, high packing density, and homogeneous, dense microstructure, but also in high early and late mechanical properties.

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Manuscript Submission: HERE

  • Impact Factor (2019): 2.731
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2019): 0.415
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2019): 87
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Impact Factor (2018): 2.471
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2018): 0.634
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 78
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Condensed Matter Physics
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q2 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1969
Volumes
per Year
4
Issues
per Year
24
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1388-6150 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2926 (Online)

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