Authors:
R. Frost Queensland University of Technology Inorganic Materials Research Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences Brisbane Queensland Australia GPO Box 2434 4001 Brisbane Queensland Australia GPO Box 2434 4001

Search for other papers by R. Frost in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
J. Kristóf University of Veszprém Department of Analytical Chemistry Veszprém Hungary P.O. Box 158 8201 Veszprém Hungary P.O. Box 158 8201

Search for other papers by J. Kristóf in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
W. Martens University of Veszprém Department of Analytical Chemistry Veszprém Hungary P.O. Box 158 8201 Veszprém Hungary P.O. Box 158 8201

Search for other papers by W. Martens in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
M. Weier Queensland University of Technology Inorganic Materials Research Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences Brisbane Queensland Australia GPO Box 2434 4001 Brisbane Queensland Australia GPO Box 2434 4001

Search for other papers by M. Weier in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
E. Horváth University of Veszprém Department of Environmental Engineering and Chemical Technology Veszprém Hungary P.O. Box 158 8201 Veszprém Hungary P.O. Box 158 8201

Search for other papers by E. Horváth in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

The mineral sabugalite (HAl)0.5[(UO2)2(PO4)]2⋅8H2O, has been studied using a combination of energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, dynamic and controlled rate thermal analysis techniques. X-ray diffraction shows that the starting material in the thermal decomposition is sabugalite and the product of the thermal treatment is a mixture of aluminium and uranyl phosphates. Four mass loss steps are observed for the dehydration of sabugalite at 48°C (temperature range 39 to 59°C), 84°C (temperature range 59 to 109°C), 127°C (temperature range 109 to 165°C) and around 270°C (temperature range 175 to 525°C) with mass losses of 2.8, 6.5, 2.3 and 4.4%, respectively, making a total mass loss of water of 16.0%. In the CRTA experiment mass loss stages were found at 60, 97, 140 and 270°C which correspond to four dehydration steps involving the loss of 2, 6, 6 and 2 moles of water. These mass losses result in the formation of four phases namely meta(I)sabugalite, meta(II)sabugalite, meta(III)sabugalite and finally uranyl phosphate and alumina phosphates. The use of a combination of dynamic and controlled rate thermal analysis techniques enabled a definitive study of the thermal decomposition of sabugalite. While the temperature ranges and the mass losses vary due to the different experimental conditions, the results of the CRTA analysis should be considered as standard data due to the quasi-equilibrium nature of the thermal decomposition process.

  • Collapse
  • Expand

To see the editorial board, please visit the website of Springer Nature.

Manuscript Submission: HERE

For subscription options, please visit the website of Springer Nature.

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1969
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
24
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1388-6150 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2926 (Online)

Monthly Content Usage

Abstract Views Full Text Views PDF Downloads
Feb 2024 9 0 0
Mar 2024 5 0 0
Apr 2024 10 0 0
May 2024 5 0 0
Jun 2024 5 0 0
Jul 2024 4 0 0
Aug 2024 0 0 0