Authors:
Lisardo Núñez-RegueiraUniversity of Santiago de Compostela Research Group TERBIPROMAT, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, Av. J. M. Suárez Núñez s/n Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782 Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782

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J. Rodríguez-AñónUniversity of Santiago de Compostela Research Group TERBIPROMAT, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, Av. J. M. Suárez Núñez s/n Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782 Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782

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J. Proupín-CastiñeirasUniversity of Santiago de Compostela Research Group TERBIPROMAT, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, Av. J. M. Suárez Núñez s/n Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782 Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782

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Maria Villanueva-LópezUniversity of Santiago de Compostela Research Group TERBIPROMAT, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, Av. J. M. Suárez Núñez s/n Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782 Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782

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O. Núñez-FernándezUniversity of Santiago de Compostela Research Group TERBIPROMAT, Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Physics, Av. J. M. Suárez Núñez s/n Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782 Santiago de Compostela Spain 15782

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Abstract  

Microcalorimetry was used to study the seasonal evolution over one year of the microbial activity in a humic-eutrophic Cambisol soil as a function of its forest cover. The study was carried out on three soils with identical origin but covered with different forest species: pine, eucalyptus, and a typical Atlantic-humid riverside forest. Some other physical, chemical and biological properties and environmental parameters, mainly humidity and environmental temperature, were considered to analyze their influence on soil microbial activity. The study was performed using a microcalorimeter Thermal Analysis Monitor 2277 in which the experiments were carried out with 1 g soil samples treated with 1.25 mg glucose g–1 soil. From the measured results it follows that pine forest soil is the least productive of the three, as it generates an average heat of 2.7 vs. 5.9 J g–1 generated by the eucalyptus forest soil and 3.1 J g–1 generated by the riverside forest soil. These results are dependent on the remaining physical, chemical and biological features analysed and because of this, pine forest soil, with a pH value 3.3 in spring, shows a small capacity to maintain a stable microbial population which is the lowest of the three (0.079108 to 0.46108 microorganisms g–1 soil) while riverside soil microbial population is in the range from 7.9108 to 17108 microorganisms g–1 soil.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1969
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
24
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1388-6150 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2926 (Online)

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