Authors:
Veronika Vágvölgyi University of Pannonia Department of Analytical Chemistry 8201 Veszprém PO Box 158 Hungary

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M. Hales Queensland University of Technology Inorganic Materials Research Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences 2 George Street GPO Box 2434 Brisbane Queensland 4001 Australia

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R. Frost Queensland University of Technology Inorganic Materials Research Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences 2 George Street GPO Box 2434 Brisbane Queensland 4001 Australia

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A. Locke Queensland University of Technology Inorganic Materials Research Program, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences 2 George Street GPO Box 2434 Brisbane Queensland 4001 Australia

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J. Kristóf University of Pannonia Department of Analytical Chemistry 8201 Veszprém PO Box 158 Hungary

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Erzsébet Horváth University of Pannonia Department of Environmental Engineering and Chemical Technology 8201 Veszprém PO Box 158 Hungary

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Abstract  

The understanding of the thermal stability of magnesium carbonates and the relative metastability of hydrous carbonates including hydromagnesite, artinite, nesquehonite, barringtonite and lansfordite is extremely important to the sequestration process for the removal of atmospheric CO2. The conventional thermal analysis of synthetic nesquehonite proves that dehydration takes place in two steps at 157, 179°C and decarbonation at 416 and 487°C. Controlled rate thermal analysis shows the first dehydration step is isothermal and the second quasi-isothermal at 108 and 145°C. In the CRTA experiment carbon dioxide is evolved at 376°C. CRTA technology offers better resolution and a more detailed interpretation of the decomposition processes of magnesium carbonates such as nesquehonite via approaching equilibrium conditions of decomposition through the elimination of the slow transfer of heat to the sample as a controlling parameter on the process of decomposition. Constant-rate decomposition processes of non-isothermal nature reveal partial collapse of the nesquehonite structure.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
1969
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
24
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1388-6150 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2926 (Online)

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