View More View Less
  • 1 Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749, Korea
  • | 2 Department of Chemical Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749, Korea
  • | 3 R&D Center Kolon Industries, Inc., 294 Gajwa-dong, Seo-Gu, Incheon 404-250, Korea
Restricted access

Abstract

A kinetic model of the homogeneous conversion of d-xylose in high temperature water (HTW) was developed. Experimental testing evaluated the effects of operating conditions on xylose conversion and furfural selectivity, with furfural yields of up to 60% observed without the use of acid catalysts. The reaction order for the decomposition of d-xylose was assumed to be above two, while the conversion of d-xylose to furfural and the degradation of furfural were first order reactions. Estimated kinetic parameters were within the range of values reported in the literature. The activation energy of furfural production showed that the ionization rate was high enough for HTW to replace acid catalysts. Simulated results from this model were in good agreement with experimental data, allowing the model to aid reactor design for the maximization of productivity.

  • 1.

    Chheda, JN, Huber, GW, Dumesic, JA. 2007. Liquid-phase catalytic processing of biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons to fuels and chemicals. Angew Chem Int Ed. 46:71647183 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    MJ Antal Jr Leesomboon, T, Mok, WS. 1991. Mechanism of formation of 2-furaldehyde from d-xylose. Carbohydr Res. 217:7185 .

  • 3.

    Moreau, C, Belgacem, MN, Gandini, A. 2004. Recent catalytic advances in the chemistry of substituted furans from carbohydrates and in the ensuing polymers. Top Catal. 27:1130 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Lavarack, BP, Griffin, GJ, Rodmanc, D. 2002. The acid hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse hemicellulose to produce xylose, arabinose, glucose and other products. Biomass Bioenergy. 23:367380 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Demirbas, A. 2006. Furfural production from fruit shells by acid-catalyzed hydrolysis. Energy Sources A Recovery Util Environ Eff. 28:157165.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 6.

    Sangarunlert, W, Piumsomboon, P, Ngamprasertsith, S. 2007. Furfural production by acid hydrolysis and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction from rice husk. Korean J Chem Eng. 24:936941 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Vázquez, M, Oliva, M, Téllez-Luis, SJ, Ramírez, JA. 2007. Hydrolysis of sorghum straw using phosphoric acid: evaluation of furfural production. Bioresour Technol. 98:30533060 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Marcotullio, G W De Jong 2010. Chloride ions enhance furfural formation from d-xylose in dilute aqueous acidic solutions. Green Chem. 12:17391746 .

  • 9.

    Sasaki, M (2003) SH Feng JS Chen Z Shi eds. Hydrothermal reactions and techniques World Scientific Singapore.

  • 10.

    Aida, TM, Shiraishi, N, Kubo, M, Watanabe, M RL Smith Jr 2010. Reaction kinetics of d-xylose in sub- and supercritical water. J Supercrit Fluids. 55:208216 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Jing, Q, Lu, X. 2007. Kinetics of non-catalyzed decomposition of d-xylose in high temperature liquid water. Chin J Chem Eng. 15:666669 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Akiya, N, Savage, PE. 2002. Roles of water for chemical reactions in high temperature water. Chem Rev. 102:27252750 .

  • 13.

    Weingarten, R, Cho, J WCC Conner Jr Huber, GW. 2010. Kinetics of furfural production by dehydration of xylose in a biphasic reactor with microwave heating. Green Chem. 12:14231429 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 14.

    Boudart, M. 1972. Two-step catalytic reactions. AIChE. J18:465478 .

  • 15.

    Fogler, HS. 1999 Elements of chemical reaction engineering Prentice-Hall New Jersey.

  • 16.

    Veeraraghavan S , Chambers RP, Myles M, Lee YA (1982) Kinetic model and reactor development in hemicelluloses hydrolysis. AIChE national meeting, Orlando, USA.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 17.

    Eken-Saraçoglu, N, Mutlu, SF, Dilmaç, G, Çavusoglu, H. 1998. A comparative kinetic study of acidic hemicelluloses hydrolysis in corn cob and sunflower seed hulls. Bioresour Technol. 65:2933 .

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 18.

    Williams, DL, Dunlop, AP. 1948. Kinetics of furfural destruction in acidic aqueous media. Ind Eng Chem. 40:239241 .

  • 19.

    Rose, IC, Epstein, N, Watkinson, AP. 2000. Acid-catalyzed 2-furaldehyde (furfural) decomposition kinetics. Ind Eng Chem Res. 39:843845 .

  • 20.

    Garrett, ER, Dvorchik, BH. 1969. Kinetics and mechanisms of the acid degradation of the aldopentoses of furfural. J Pharm Sci. 58:813820 .

Manuscript submission: www.editorialmanager.com/reac

  • Impact Factor (2019): 1.520
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2019): 0.345
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2019): 39
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q3 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • SJR Quartile Score (2019): Q4 Catalysis
  • Impact Factor (2018): 1.142
  • Scimago Journal Rank (2018): 0.374
  • SJR Hirsch-Index (2018): 37
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q3 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • SJR Quartile Score (2018): Q3 Catalysis

For subscription options, please visit the website of Springer

Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms and Catalysis
Language English
Size B5
Year of
Foundation
1974
Volumes
per Year
3
Issues
per Year
6
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1878-5190 (Print)
ISSN 1878-5204 (Online)