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  • 1 Institute of Catalysis, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str. Block 11, 1113, Sofia, Bulgaria
  • | 2 Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu”, Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei Str., 060021, Bucharest-12, Romania
  • | 3 Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str. Block 11, 1113, Sofia, Bulgaria
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Abstract

The effect of nickel content on the structure and activity of co-precipitated Ni–Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as catalyst precursors for CO2 removal by methanation was studied by variation of the Ni2+/Al3+ molar ratio (Ni2+/Al3+ = 3.0, 1.5 and 0.5), and of the reduction and reaction temperatures as well as of the space velocities. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), H2 chemisorption, and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) techniques were applied for physicochemical characterization of the samples. It was specified that the nano-scaled dimensions of the as-synthesized samples also generate nano-metrical metallic nickel particles (PXRD). The existence of readily and hardly reducible Ni2+–O species in the studied samples (TPR), affects catalytic performance. The studied catalysts hydrogenate CO2 effectively to residual concentrations of the latter in the range of 0–10 ppm at reaction temperatures from 400 to 220 °C and space velocities between 22,000 and 3000 h−1. The variation of the CO2 methanation activity with the changes of space velocities depends on the nickel content, and reduction and reaction temperatures. After reduction at 400 and 450 °C, a sample of Ni2+/Al3+ = 3.0 has demonstrated the highest conversion degree at all the reaction temperatures and space velocities, while a catalyst of Ni2+/Al3+ = 0.5 dominated in the methanation activity after reduction within 530–600 °C. The Ni2+/Al3+ = 1.5 catalyst data take intermediate position between Ni2+/Al3+ = 3.0 and Ni2+/Al3+ = 0.5 often closer to Ni2+/Al3+ = 3.0 ones. The studied Ni–Al LDH systems are found to be promising catalyst precursors for fine CO2 removal from hydrogen-rich gas streams through the methanation reaction, depending on the technological regime of catalyst activation.

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