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  • 1 University of Leipzig Institute of Psychology Seeburgstr. 14–20 D-04103 Leipzig Germany
  • | 2 Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg Institute of Psychology Ammerländer Heerstr. 114–118 D-26129 Oldenburg Germany
  • | 3 Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology H-1394 Budapest P.O. Box 398 Hungary
  • | 4 Budapest University of Technology and Economics Department of Telecommunications and Media Informatics H-1117 Budapest Magyar tudósok krt. 2 Hungary
  • | 5 University of Plymouth Cognition Institute and School of Psychology Drake Circus Plymouth PL4 8AA UK
  • | 6 University of Szeged Institute of Psychology H-6722 Szeged Petőfi S. sgt. 30–34 Hungary
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Sound sources often emit trains of discrete sounds, such as a series of footsteps. Previously, two different principles have been suggested for how the human auditory system binds discrete sounds together into perceptual units. The feature similarity principle is based on linking sounds with similar characteristics over time. The predictability principle is based on linking sounds that follow each other in a predictable manner. The present study compared the effects of these two principles. Participants were presented with tone sequences and instructed to continuously indicate whether they perceived a single coherent sequence or two concurrent streams of sound. We investigated the influence of separate manipulations of similarity and predictability on these perceptual reports. Both grouping principles affected perception of the tone sequences, albeit with different characteristics. In particular, results suggest that whereas predictability is only analyzed for the currently perceived sound organization, feature similarity is also analyzed for alternative groupings of sound. Moreover, changing similarity or predictability within an ongoing sound sequence led to markedly different dynamic effects. Taken together, these results provide evidence for different roles of similarity and predictability in auditory scene analysis, suggesting that forming auditory stream representations and competition between alternatives rely on partly different processes.

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Learning & Perception
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
2009
Publication
Programme
ceased
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1789-3186 (Print)
ISSN 2060-9175 (Online)

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