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  • 1 Department of Radiology and Oncotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
  • | 2 Department of Health Behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA
  • | 3 Department of Neurology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA
  • | 4 Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
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Abstract

Objective

To compare the levels of indoor air pollution found in a sample of public locations in Hungary where smoking was and was not observed.

Methods

The TSI SidePak AM510 Personal Aerosol Monitor was used to measure the concentration of particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) observed in the ambient air of 6 pubs, 5 restaurants, 11 cafes, and 20 other locations in Budapest and Zalakaros between January and August 2008.

Results

In the 26 places where smoking was observed the average PM2.5 level was 102.3 μg/m3 [range: 3–487 μg/m3]; compared to 5.1 μg/m3 [range: 0–28 μg/m3] in the 16 places where smoking was not observed.

Conclusions

The levels of indoor fine particle air pollution measured in public locations in Hungary where smoking was observed were 18 times higher than the levels in locations where smoking was not observed and in nearly all instances exceeded the levels that the World Health Organization and US Environmental Protection Agency have concluded are harmful to human health.

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Clinical and Experimental Medical Journal
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
2007
Publication
Programme
ceased
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2060-6249 (Print)
ISSN 2060-968X (Online)

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