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  • 1 Department of Medical Laboratory Analytics, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, P.O. Box 55, H-4012 Debrecen, Hungary
  • 2 Department of Dermatology, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, Nagyerdei krt 98, H-4012 Debrecen, Hungary
  • 3 Department of Clinical Laboratory and Imaging Diagnostics, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, P.O. Box 55, H-4012 Debrecen, Hungary
  • 4 Department of Clinical Laboratory and Imaging Diagnostics, Faculty of Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, P.O. Box 55, H-4012 Debrecen, Hungary
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Abstract

Background

An early event in the pathogenesis of vitiligo may be the chronic oxidative stress via elevated hydrogen peroxide due to decreased blood catalase. There are controversial reports on association of vitiligo and +22348C→T polymorphism.

Methods

We examined this polymorphism and blood catalase in Hungarian vitiligo patients (n: 78) and controls (n: 201). Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes and a PCR/SSCP method was used for genetic examination.

Results

Blood catalase activity, genotype and allele frequencies did not change in Hungarian vitiligo patients. The mutant CT and TT genotypes yielded decreased (p < 0.05) blood catalase activities in females. The association of the +22348C→T polymorphism and vitiligo in Hungary is non-significant (p > 0.0813), contrary to the significant (p < 0.05) increase of mutant CT genotype and T allele frequencies in US/Canada and in UK.

Conclusions

Our results based on blood catalase determinations and genetic examination of +22348C→T polymorphism suggest that they may provide a weak contribution to the vitiligo pathology in female vitiligo patients by the increased oxidative stress. It may be caused by the increased hydrogen peroxide due to the decreased blood catalase.

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