Authors:
Alajos Pár I-st Department of Medicine, Pécs, Hungary
First Department of Medicine, University of Pécs, Ifjúság u. 13, H-7624 Pécs, Hungary

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Péter Kisfali Department of Medical Genetics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary

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Béla Melegh Department of Medical Genetics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary

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István Tornai II-nd Department of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary

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Judit Gervain St. György Hospital, Székesfehérvár, Hungary

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Ferenc Szalay I-st Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

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Márta Varga Réthy Pál Hospital, Békéscsaba, Hungary

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Mária Papp II-nd Department of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary

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János Schuller United St. István and St. László Hospital, Budapest, Hungary

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Anna Tusnádi Hetényi Géza Hospital, Szolnok, Hungary

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János Fehér II-nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

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Gabriella Lengyel II-nd Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

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Zsuzsanna Nemes I-st Department of Medicine, Pécs, Hungary

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Zoltán Péterfi I-st Department of Medicine, Pécs, Hungary

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Béla Hunyady I-st Department of Medicine, Pécs, Hungary

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Áron Vincze I-st Department of Medicine, Pécs, Hungary

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Gabriella Pár I-st Department of Medicine, Pécs, Hungary

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Abstract

Background

Since the clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection depends on the cytokines which are under genetic control, we have studied genetic polymorphisms of two pro-inflammatory interleukin-28B (IL-28B) (also named as interferon λ-3) and lymphotoxin-A (LT-A) as well as of one anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) genes in patients with HCV infection. We examined the allele frequencies of these genes in HCV patients as compared with healthy controls, and determined their association with sustained virological response (SVR) on PEG-IFN α-2a + ribavirin (RBV) (P/R) treatment, to assess the predictive value of these genetic variants. A total of 292 chronic HCV genotype 1 infected patients and 104 healthy controls have been studied. The samples were genotyped using PCR-RFLP and ABI Taqman genotyping assay.

Results

IL-28B — The C/C genotype in HCV patients occurred with lower frequency than in healthy controls (28.11% vs. 51.92%, p = 0.0001, OD 2.76), suggesting a protective role of this variant. At the same time, P/R treated patients with this C/C genotype achieved SVR at a higher rate, than those who have TT genotype (54.34% vs. 29.16%, p = 0.0447, OD 2.86). LT-A A252G — The frequency of A/A genotype did not differ between HCV patients and controls, but G/G homozygosity was found at a reduced rate in non-treated subgroup of HCV patients as compared to controls (2.91% vs. 9.90%, p = 0.041, OR 3.66). The G/G genotype seemed to be a predictor of SVR versus A/A genotype: SVR occurred in G/G pts 54.54% versus 44.94% in AA cases (not significant, NS). IL-10R 1087 — The G/G genotype in HCV patients occurred with lower frequency than in controls (37.15% vs. 52.74%, p = 0.00957, OD 1.89). G/G harboring patients showed higher SVR than patients with A/A genotypes (41.26% vs. 28.57%) (NS).

Conclusion

We have found that IL-28B C/C genotype was a protective genetic variant and a predictor of SVR in chronic HCV infection. Furthermore, our data suggest that presumable predictors may also be both IL-10 and LT-A gene polymorphisms; however, that needs to be confirmed by studies with a larger number of HCV patients.

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Clinical and Experimental Medical Journal
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
2007
Publication
Programme
ceased
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2060-6249 (Print)
ISSN 2060-968X (Online)

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