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  • 1 Department of Cardiology, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary
  • | 2 Department of Internal Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary
  • | 3 Department of Cardiology, University of Debrecen, Móricz Zs. krt. 22, H-4032, Debrecen, Hungary
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Abstract

Aims: We investigated the influence of body mass index (BMI) on the prevalence of responder status in chronic heart failure patients after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT).

Methods: Data on 169 patients with resynchronization therapy were analyzed. Patients were categorized on the basis of the BMI measured at device implantation according to the WHO classification, as normal (BMI: 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (BMI: 25–29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI:≥30 kg/m2). Patients were considered responders if left ventricular ejection fraction was increased by at least 5% at 6-month follow-up.

Results: The mean age in the study population was 60.9±10.86 years (females 29%). The BMI subgroups did not exhibit any significant differences in baseline characteristics (age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction or NYHA class). Elevated BMIs were associated with higher prevalence of responder status (overweight: 71.4%, obese: 63.0%) relative to subjects with a normal BMI (44.7%) (p=0.015).

Conclusions: In this CRT population, overweight status was associated with a more favorable response to CRT, indicating that the response may possibly be influenced by factors other than those directly related to the heart status or the technical details of the CRT.

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2019  
Scimago
H-index
11
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,220
Scimago
Quartile Score
Medicine (miscellaneous) Q3
Scopus
Cite Score
155/133=1,2
Scopus
Cite Score Rank
General Medicine 199/529 (Q2)
Scopus
SNIP
0,343
Scopus
Cites
206
Scopus
Documents
23

 

Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Language English
Size  
Year of
Foundation
2009
Publication
Programme
changed title
Volumes
per Year
 
Issues
per Year
 
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 2061-1617 (Print)
ISSN 2061-5094 (Online)

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