View More View Less
  • 1 Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130102, Jilin Province, China
  • | 2 Jilin Academy of Agricultural Science, Changchun, 130124, Jilin, China
Restricted access

Abstract

Soil moisture is a major driving force of plant community succession in restored meadows. Existing studies mainly focus on diversity-productivity relationships. However, studies which determine the effects of soil moisture on the plant community properties in restored meadows are lacking. In this study, we conducted a chronosequence analysis of the interactions between soil water content variation and plant community properties in meadows following passive restoration (3-, 5-, 9-, 14-, 17-, 21-year restoration) of abandoned farmlands on the Sanjiang Plain, China. Results showed that the plant community was characterized by ruderal plants in the initial year of succession, and then by perennial plants such as Calamagrostis angustifolia and Carex spp. in older restored meadows. Similarity of restored community to target site increased across succession time whereas species diversity gradually decreased. Plant height, coverage and biomass increased with restoration time, with plant density being the exception. The community height, coverage and root/shoot ratio were positively related to the water content in the surface soil layer (0–10 cm). Conversely, plant density was significantly and negatively related with soil moisture at 0–10 cm soil depth. Plant diversity (Shannon index, Richness index and evenness) was closely correlated to soil water content at the soil depth of 0–10 cm. Our findings indicate that vegetation of cultivated meadows could be effectively restored by passive restoration. Change of plant species diversity is an especially important response to hydrological recovery in restored meadows on the Sanjiang Plain.

  • Balata, D., L. Piazzi and F. Cinelli. 2004. A comparison among assemblages in areas invaded by Caulerpa taxifolia and C. racemosa on a subtidal Mediterranean rocky bottom. Mar. Ecol. 25 (1): 113.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Baldwin, A.H., M.S. Egnotovich and E. Clarke. 2001. Hydrologic change and vegetation of tidal freshwater marshes: field, greenhouse, and seed-bank experiments. Wetlands 21: 519532.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bever, D.J. 2003. Soil community feedback and the coexistence of competitors: conceptual frameworks and empirical tests. New Phytol. 157: 465473.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Biederman, L.A. and S.G. Whisenant. 2011. Using mounds to create microtopography alters plant community development early in restoration. Restor. Ecol. 19: 5361.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bloom, A.J., F.S. Chapin and H.A. Mooney. 1985. Resource limitation in plants - an economic analogy. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 16: 363392.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Casanova, M.T. and M.A. Brock. 2000. How do depth, duration and frequency of flooding influence the establishment of wetland plant communities?, Plant Ecol. 147: 237250.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • De Steven, D. and M.M. Toner. 2004. Vegetation of upper coastal plain depression wetlands: environmental templates and wetland dynamics within a landscape framework. Wetlands 24: 2342.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • De Steven, D., R.R. Sharitz and C.D. Barton. 2010. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored Southeastern depressional wetlands. Wetlands 30: 11291140.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Deák, B., O. Valkó, P. Török, A. Kelemen, T. Miglécz, S. Szabó, G. Szabó and B. Tóthmérész. 2015. Micro-topographic heterogeneity increases plant diversity in old stages of restored grasslands. Basic Appl. Ecol. 16: 291299.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Editorial Committee of Flora of China. 2004. Flora of China. Science Press, Beijing.

  • Ellison, A.M. and B.L. Bedford. 1995. Response of a wetland vascular plant community to disturbance: a simulation study. Ecol. Appl. 5: 109123.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ewing, K. 2002. Mounding as a technique for restoration of prairie on a capped landfill in the Puget Sound lowlands. Restor. Ecol. 10: 289296.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Grootjans, A.P., L.F.M. Fresco, C.C. de Leeuw and P.C. Schipper. 1996. Degeneration of species-rich Calthion palustris hay meadows; some considerations on the community concept. J. Veg. Sci. 7: 185194.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Guo, J., H. Jiang, H. Bian, L. Sheng, C. He and Y. Gao. 2017. Natural succession is a feasible approach for cultivated peatland restoration in Northeast China. Ecol. Eng. 104: 3944.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Härdtle, W., B. Redecker, T. Assmann and H. Meyer. 2005. Vegetation responses to environmental conditions in floodplain grasslands: prerequisites for preserving plant species diversity. Basic Appl. Ecol. 7: 280288.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hedberg, P., W. Kotowski, P. Saetre, K. Mälson, H. Rydin and S. Sundberg. 2012. Vegetation recovery after multiple-site experimental fen restorations. Biol. Conserv. 147: 6067.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hefting, M., J.C. Clément, D. Dowrick, A.C. Cosandey, S. Bernal, C. Cimpian, A. Tatur, T.P. Burt and G. Pinay. 2004. Water table elevation controls on soil nitrogen cycling in riparian wetlands along a European climatic gradient. Biogeochemistry 67 (1): 113134.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Heisler-White, J.L., A.K. Knapp and E.F. Kelly. 2008. Increasing precipitation event size increases aboveground net primary productivity in a semi-arid grassland. Oecologia 158: 129140.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Huang, N., Z. Wang, D. Liu and Z. Niu. 2010. Selecting sites for converting farmlands to wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, based on remote sensing and GIS. Environ. Manage. 46: 790800.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Johnson, W.C., S.E. Boettcher, K.A. Poiani and G. Guntenspergen. 2004. Influence of weather extremes on the water levels of glaciated prairie wetlands. Wetlands 24: 385398.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kelemen, A., P. Török, O. Valkó, T. Miglécz and B. Tóthmérész. 2013. Mechanisms shaping plant biomass and species richness: Plant strategies and litter effect in alkali and loess grasslands. J. Veg. Sci. 24: 11951203.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kirk, J.A., W.R. Wise and J.J. Delfino. 2004. Water budget and cost effectiveness analysis of wetland restoration alternatives: a case study of Levy Prairie, Alachua County, Florida. Ecol. Eng. 22: 4360.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Konar, M., M.J. Todd, R. Muneepeerakul, A. Rinaldo and I. Rodriguez-Iturbe. 2013. Hydrology as a driver of biodiversity: controls on carrying capacity, niche formation, and dispersal. Adv. Water Resour. 51: 317325.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Li, H.Y. and W.F. Wang. 2005. Profound significance for converting farmland to wetland in the Sanjiang Plain. Modernizing Agr. 2: 13. (in Chinese)

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Li, S., D. Zhou, Z. Luan, Y. Pan and C. Jiao. 2011. Quantitative simulation on soil moisture contents of two typical vegetation communities in Sanjiang Plain, China. Chin. Geogr. Sci. 21: 723733.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Liu, M., G. Liu and X. Zheng. 2015. Spatial pattern changes of biomass, litterfall and coverage with environmental factors across temperate grassland subjected to various management practices. Landscape Ecol. 30 (3): 477486.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Loheide, S.P. and S.M. Gorelick. 2007. Riparian hydroecology: A coupled model of the observed interactions between groundwater flow and meadow vegetation patterning. Water Resour. Res. 43: W07414.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Manchester, S., J.O. Treweek, O. Mountford, R. Pywell and T. Sparks. 1998. Restoration of a target wet grassland community on exarable land. In: C.B. Joyce and P.M. Wade (eds.), European Wet Grasslands: Biodiversity, Management and Restoration. Wiley, Chichester, UK.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Matthews, J.W., G. Spyreas and A.G. Endress. 2009. Trajectories of vegetation based indicators used to assess wetland restoration progress. Ecol. Appl. 19: 20932107.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Meyer, C.K., S.G. Baer and M.R. Whiles. 2008. Ecosystem recovery across a chronosequence of restored wetlands in the Platte River Valley. Ecosystems 11: 193208.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mitsch, W.J. and J.G. Gosselink. 2000. Wetlands. John Wiley & Sons, New York.

  • Mueller, K.E., D. Tilman, A. Fornara and S.E. Hobbie. 2013. Root depth distribution and the diversity-productivity relationship in a long-term grassland experiment. Ecology 94 (4): 787793.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mulhouse, J.M. and S.M. Galatowitsch. 2003. Revegetation of prairie pothole wetlands in the mid-continental US: twelve years post-reflooding. Plant Ecol. 169: 143159.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Shaffer, P.W. and T.L. Ernst. 1999. Distribution of soil organic matter in freshwater emergent/open water wetlands in the Portland, Oregon, Metropolitan Area. Wetlands 19: 505516.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Stroh, P.A., F.M.R. Hughes, T.H. Sparks and J.O. Mountford. 2012. The influence of time on the soil seed bank and vegetation across a landscape-scale wetland restoration project. Restor. Ecol. 20: 103112.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Suding, K.N., K.L. Gross and G.R. Houseman. 2004. Alternative states and positive feedbacks in restoration ecology. Trends Ecol. Evol. 19: 4653.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Toogood, S.E., C.B. Joyce and S. Waite. 2008. Response of flood-plain grassland plant communities to altered water regimes. Plant Ecol. 197 (2): 285298.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Toth, L.A. 2010. Unrealized expectations for restoration of a flood-plain plant community. Restor. Ecol. 18: 810819.

  • Valkó, O., B. Deák, P. Török, A. Kelemen, T. Miglécz and B. Tóthmérész. 2017. Filling up the gaps—Passive restoration does work on linear landscape elements. Ecol. Eng. 102: 501508.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Vásquez-Méndez, R., E. Ventura-Ramos, K. Oleschko, L. Hernández-Sandoval, J.F. Parrot and M.A. Nearing. 2010. Soil erosion and runoff in different vegetation patches from semiarid Central Mexico. Catena 80: 162169.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Vécrin, M.P., R. Van Diggelen, F. Grévilliot and S. Muller. 2002. Restoration of species-rich flood-plain meadows from abandoned arable fields in NE France. Appl. Veg. Sci. 5 (2): 263270.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wang, L., C. Song, J. Hu and T. Yang. 2010. Response of regeneration diversity of Carex lasiocarpa community to different water levels in Sanjiang Plain, China. Chin. Geogr. Sci. 20 (1): 3742.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wang, Z.H. 2004. Relationship between plant species diversity and soil erosion on different secondary succession phases of a semihumid evergreen broad-leaved forest. In: Proceedings of the 13th International soil conservation organization conference, Brisbane, paper No. 990.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wang, Z., B. Zhang, S. Zhang, X. Li, D. Liu, K. Song, J. Li, F. Li and H. Duan. 2006. Changes of land use and of ecosystem service values in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China. Environ. Monit. Assess. 112 (13): 6991.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wellstein, C., G. Campetella, F. Spada, S. Chelli, L. Mucina, R. Canullo and S. Bartha. 2014. Context-dependent assembly rules and the role of dominating grasses in semi-natural abandoned sub-Mediterranean grasslands. Agr. Ecosyst. Environ. 182: 113122.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wu, G.L., G.H. Ren, D. Wang, Z.H. Shi and D. Warrington. 2013. Above-and belowground response to soil water change in an alpine wetland ecosystem on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China. J. Hydrol. 476: 120127.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wu, G.L., Z.N. Zhang, D. Wang, Z.H. Shi and Y.J. Zhu. 2014. Interactions of soil water content heterogeneity and species diversity patterns in semi-arid steppes on the Loess Plateau of China. J. Hydrol. 519: 13621367.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zhao, K.Y., Y.J. Luo, D.M. Zhou and X.L. Zhou. 2008. A study of current status and conservation of threatened wetland ecological environment in Sanjiang Plain. J. Nat. Resour. 23 (5): 790796. (in Chinese).

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Click HERE for submission guidelines.


Manuscript submission: COMEC Manuscript Submission

 

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Podani, János

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Jordán, Ferenc

Honorary Editor(s): Orlóci, László

Editorial Board

  • Madhur Anand, CAN (forest ecology, computational ecology, and ecological complexity)
  • S. Bagella, ITA (temporal dynamics, including succession, community level patterns of species richness and diversity, experimental studies of plant, animal and microbial communities, plant communities of the Mediterranean)
  • P. Batáry, HUN (landscape ecology, agroecology, ecosystem services)
  • P. A. V. Borges, PRT (community level patterns of species richness and diversity, sampling in theory and practice)
  • A. Davis, GER (supervised learning, multitrophic interactions, food webs, multivariate analysis, ecological statistics, experimental design, fractals, parasitoids, species diversity, community assembly, ticks, biodiversity, climate change, biological networks, cranes, olfactometry, evolution)
  • Z. Elek, HUN (insect ecology, invertebrate conservation, population dynamics, especially of long-term field studies, insect sampling)
  • T. Kalapos, HUN (community level plant ecophysiology, grassland ecology, vegetation-soil relationship)
  • G. M. Kovács, HUN (microbial ecology, plant-fungus interactions, mycorrhizas)
  • W. C. Liu,TWN (community-based ecological theory and modelling issues, temporal dynamics, including succession, trophic interactions, competition, species response to the environment)
  • L. Mucina, AUS (vegetation survey, syntaxonomy, evolutionary community ecology, assembly rules, global vegetation patterns, mediterranean ecology)
  • P. Ódor, HUN (plant communities, bryophyte ecology, numerical methods)
  • F. Rigal, FRA (island biogeography, macroecology, functional diversity, arthropod ecology)
  • D. Rocchini, ITA (biodiversity, multiple scales, spatial scales, species distribution, spatial ecology, remote sensing, ecological informatics, computational ecology)
  • F. Samu, HUN (landscape ecology, biological control, generalist predators, spiders, arthropods, conservation biology, sampling methods)
  • U. Scharler, ZAF (ecological networks, food webs, estuaries, marine, mangroves, stoichiometry, temperate, subtropical)
  • D. Schmera, HUN (aquatic communities, functional diversity, ecological theory)
  • M. Scotti, GER (community-based ecological theory and modelling issues, trophic interactions, competition, species response to the environment, ecological networks)
  • B. Tóthmérész, HUN (biodiversity, soil zoology, spatial models, macroecology, ecological modeling)
  • S. Wollrab, GER (aquatic ecology, food web dynamics, plankton ecology, predator-prey interactions)

 

Advisory Board

  • S. Bartha, HUN
  • S.L. Collins, USA
  • T. Czárán, HUN
  • E. Feoli, ITA
  • N. Kenkel, CAN
  • J. Lepš, CZE
  • S. Mazzoleni, ITA
  • Cs. Moskát, HUN
  • B. Oborny, HUN
  • M.W. Palmer, USA
  • G.P. Patil, USA
  • V. de Patta Pillar, BRA
  • C. Ricotta, ITA
  • Á. Szentesi, HUN

PODANI, JÁNOS
E-mail: podani@ludens.elte.hu


JORDÁN, FERENC
E-mail: jordan.ferenc@gmail.com

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • Biological Abstracts
  • BIOSIS Previews
  • CAB Abstracts
  • Biology & Environmental Sciences
  • Elsevier/Geo Abstracts
  • Science Citation Index Expanded
  • SCOPUS
  • Zoological Abstracts

 

 

Community Ecology
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
2000
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
2
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1585-8553 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2756 (Online)