View More View Less
  • 1 Environmental Management, University of Central Lancashire Preston, PR1 2HE, UK
  • | 2 Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, SL5 7PY, UK
  • | 3 Department of Biological Sciences, Imperial College London Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire, SL5 7PY, UK
Restricted access

A drop disc, originally conceived as a quick and easy method of measuring vegetation height, was compared to the more labour-intensive point quadrat pins in terms of usefulness in quantifying the vertical architecture of field-layer vegetation at a number of broadleaved woodland sites in Buckinghamshire, UK. The drop disc produced measures of height which correlated strongly with those of the point quadrat, as well as a potentially useful value corresponding to volume of vegetation, and it is suggested that this technique was relatively more efficient at producing useful data. A number of measures of architectural complexity showed considerable variation in how they ranked sites based upon both real and contrived data. One of these, Fisher's (or Williams) alpha, is shown to be unsuitable for this application. Based upon the weak and non-significant correlations of derived statistics, the practical difficulties in measuring architecture and unfounded assumptions that regard all arthropod species en masse, it is reasoned that explanations of community patterns with respect to architecture must be treated with caution.

  • Bright, P. W. and P. A. Morris. 1990. Habitat requirements of Dormice (Muscardinus avellanarius) in relation to woodland management in Southwest England. Biol. Conserv. 54: 307-326.

    'Habitat requirements of Dormice (Muscardinus avellanarius) in relation to woodland management in Southwest England ' () 54 Biol. Conserv : 307 -326.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Dennis, P., G. B. Usher and A. D. Watt. 1995. Lowland woodland structure and pattern and the distribution of arboreal, phytophagous arthropods. Biodivers. Conserv. 4: 728-744.

    'Lowland woodland structure and pattern and the distribution of arboreal, phytophagous arthropods ' () 4 Biodivers. Conserv. : 728 -744.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Denno, R. F. and G. K. Roderick. 1991. Influence of patch size, vegetation texture, and host plant architecture on the diversity, abundance, and life history styles of sap feeding herbivores. In: S.S. Bell, E.D. McCoy and H.R. Mushinsky (eds.), Habitat Structure: the Physical Arrangement of Objects in Space. Chapman and Hall, London, pp. 169-196.

    Influence of patch size, vegetation texture, and host plant architecture on the diversity, abundance, and life history styles of sap feeding herbivores. , () 169 -196.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Diaz Narradas, M. C., F. Garcia Novo, M. Collantes and M. Zun-zunegui. 2001. Vertical structure of wet grasslands under grazed and non-grazed conditions in Tierra del Fuego. J. Veg. Sci. 12: 385-390.

    'Vertical structure of wet grasslands under grazed and non-grazed conditions in Tierra del Fuego ' () 12 J. Veg. Sci. : 385 -390.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Wiens, J. A. 1974. Habitat heterogeneity and avian community structure in North American grasslands. Am. Midl. Nat. 91:195-213.

    'Habitat heterogeneity and avian community structure in North American grasslands ' () 91 Am. Midl. Nat. : 195 -213.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Rosenberg, N. J. 1974. Microclimate: the Biological Environment. Wiley, New York.

    Microclimate: the Biological Environment. , ().

  • Fisher, R. A., A. S. Corbet and C. B. Williams. 1943. The relation between the number of species and the number of individuals in a random sample of an animal population. J. Anim. Ecol. 12: 42-58.

    'The relation between the number of species and the number of individuals in a random sample of an animal population ' () 12 J. Anim. Ecol. : 42 -58.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Frontier, S. 1987. Applications of fractal theory to ecology. In: P. Legendre and L. Legendre (eds.), Developments in Numerical Ecology. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 335-378.

    Applications of fractal theory to ecology. , () 335 -378.

  • Gilbert, F. S. 1985. Diurnal activity patterns in hoverflies. Ecol. Entomol. 10: 385-392.

    'Diurnal activity patterns in hoverflies ' () 10 Ecol. Entomol. : 385 -392.

  • Goldsmith, F. B., C. M. Harrison and A. J. Morton. 1986. Description and analysis of vegetation. In: P.B. Moore and S.B. Chapman (eds.), Methods in Plant Ecology. Blackwell Scientific, Oxford, pp. 437-524.

    Description and analysis of vegetation. , () 437 -524.

  • Halaj, J., D. W. Ross and A. R. Moldenke. 2000. Importance of habitat structure to the arthropod food-web in Douglas-fir canopies. Oikos 90: 139-152.

    'Importance of habitat structure to the arthropod food-web in Douglas-fir canopies ' () 90 Oikos : 139 -152.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Hurlbert, S. H. 1971. The nonconcept of species diversity: a critique and alternative parameters. Ecology 52: 577-586.

    'The nonconcept of species diversity: a critique and alternative parameters ' () 52 Ecology : 577 -586.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • MacArthur, R. H. and J. W. MacArthur. 1961. On bird species diversity. Ecology 42: 594-598.

    'On bird species diversity ' () 42 Ecology : 594 -598.

  • McCoy, E. D. and S. S. Bell. 1991. Habitat structure: the evolution and diversification of a complex topic. In: E.D. McCoy, S.S. Bell and H.R. Mushinsky (eds.), Habitat Structure: the Physical Arrangement of Objects in Space. Chapman and Hall, London, pp. 3-27.

    Habitat structure: the evolution and diversification of a complex topic. , () 3 -27.

  • Morse, D. R., J. H. Lawton, M. M. Dodson and M. H. Williamson. 1985. Fractal dimension of vegetation and the distribution of arthropod body lengths. Nature 314: 731-733.

    'Fractal dimension of vegetation and the distribution of arthropod body lengths ' () 314 Nature : 731 -733.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • J. Myers, H. and D. Bazely. 1991. Thorns, spines, prickles, and hairs: are they stimulated by herbivory and do they deter herbivores? In: D.W. Tallamy and M.J. Raupp (eds.), Phytochemical Induction by Herbivores. John Wiley & Sons, New York, pp. 325-344.

    Thorns, spines, prickles, and hairs: are they stimulated by herbivory and do they deter herbivores , () 325 -344.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Raunkiaer, C. 1934. The Life Forms of Plants and Statistical Plant Geography. Clarendon, London.

    The Life Forms of Plants and Statistical Plant Geography. , ().

  • Richardson, L. F. 1960. The problem of contiguity: an appendix to statistics of deadly quarrels. In: L.von Bertalanffy (ed.) General Systems Year Book V. Society for General Systems Research, Ann Arbor, MI, pp. 139-187.

    The problem of contiguity: an appendix to statistics of deadly quarrels. , () 139 -187.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Rodwell, J. S. (ed.) 1991. British Plant Communities. Vol. 1. Woodlands and Scrub. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

    British Plant Communities. Vol. 1. Woodlands and Scrub. , ().

  • Southwood, T. R. E. 1986. Plant surfaces and insects - an overview. In: B. Juniper and T.R.E. Southwood (eds.), Insects and the Plant Surface. Edward Arnold, London, pp. 1-22.

    Plant surfaces and insects - an overview. , () 1 -22.

  • T. Southwood, R. E., V. K. Brown and P. M. Reader. 1979. The relationships of plant and insect diversities in succession. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. 12: 327-348.

    'The relationships of plant and insect diversities in succession ' () 12 Biol. J. Linn. Soc. : 327 -348.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • K. Stewart, E. J., N. A. D. Bourn and J. A. Thomas. 2001. An evaluation of three quick methods commonly used to assess sward height in ecology. J. Appl. Ecol. 38: 1148-1154.

    'An evaluation of three quick methods commonly used to assess sward height in ecology ' () 38 J. Appl. Ecol. : 1148 -1154.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Thomas, J. A. 1980. Why did the Large Blue become extinct in Britain? Oryx 15: 243-247.

    'Why did the Large Blue become extinct in Britain ' () 15 Oryx : 243 -247.

  • Williamson, M. H. and J. H. Lawton. 1991. Measuring habitat structure with fractal geometry. In: S.S. Bell, E.D. McCoy and H.R. Mushinsky (eds.), Habitat Structure: The Physical Arrangement of Objects in Space. Chapman and Hall, London, pp. 69-86.

    Measuring habitat structure with fractal geometry. , () 69 -86.

  • Bokdam, J. and J. Maurits Gleichman. 2000. Effects of grazing by free-ranging cattle on vegetation dynamics in a continental north-west European heathland. J. Appl. Ecol. 37: 415-431.

    'Effects of grazing by free-ranging cattle on vegetation dynamics in a continental north-west European heathland ' () 37 J. Appl. Ecol. : 415 -431.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Murdoch, W. W., F. C. Evans and C. H. Peterson. 1972. Diversity and pattern in plants and insects. Ecology 53: 819-828.

    'Diversity and pattern in plants and insects ' () 53 Ecology : 819 -828.

  • Sabo, S. R. 1980. Niche and habitat relations in subalpine bird communities of the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Ecol. Monogr. 50: 241-259.

    'Niche and habitat relations in subalpine bird communities of the White Mountains of New Hampshire ' () 50 Ecol. Monogr. : 241 -259.

    • Search Google Scholar
  • Scheidler, M. 1990. Influence of habitat structure and vegetation architecture on spiders. Zool. Anz. 225: 333-340.

    'Influence of habitat structure and vegetation architecture on spiders ' () 225 Zool. Anz : 333 -340.

    • Search Google Scholar

Click HERE for submission guidelines.


Manuscript submission: COMEC Manuscript Submission

 

Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Podani, János

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Jordán, Ferenc

Honorary Editor(s): Orlóci, László

Editorial Board

  • Madhur Anand, CAN (forest ecology, computational ecology, and ecological complexity)
  • S. Bagella, ITA (temporal dynamics, including succession, community level patterns of species richness and diversity, experimental studies of plant, animal and microbial communities, plant communities of the Mediterranean)
  • P. Batáry, HUN (landscape ecology, agroecology, ecosystem services)
  • P. A. V. Borges, PRT (community level patterns of species richness and diversity, sampling in theory and practice)
  • A. Davis, GER (supervised learning, multitrophic interactions, food webs, multivariate analysis, ecological statistics, experimental design, fractals, parasitoids, species diversity, community assembly, ticks, biodiversity, climate change, biological networks, cranes, olfactometry, evolution)
  • Z. Elek, HUN (insect ecology, invertebrate conservation, population dynamics, especially of long-term field studies, insect sampling)
  • T. Kalapos, HUN (community level plant ecophysiology, grassland ecology, vegetation-soil relationship)
  • G. M. Kovács, HUN (microbial ecology, plant-fungus interactions, mycorrhizas)
  • W. C. Liu,TWN (community-based ecological theory and modelling issues, temporal dynamics, including succession, trophic interactions, competition, species response to the environment)
  • L. Mucina, AUS (vegetation survey, syntaxonomy, evolutionary community ecology, assembly rules, global vegetation patterns, mediterranean ecology)
  • P. Ódor, HUN (plant communities, bryophyte ecology, numerical methods)
  • F. Rigal, FRA (island biogeography, macroecology, functional diversity, arthropod ecology)
  • D. Rocchini, ITA (biodiversity, multiple scales, spatial scales, species distribution, spatial ecology, remote sensing, ecological informatics, computational ecology)
  • F. Samu, HUN (landscape ecology, biological control, generalist predators, spiders, arthropods, conservation biology, sampling methods)
  • U. Scharler, ZAF (ecological networks, food webs, estuaries, marine, mangroves, stoichiometry, temperate, subtropical)
  • D. Schmera, HUN (aquatic communities, functional diversity, ecological theory)
  • M. Scotti, GER (community-based ecological theory and modelling issues, trophic interactions, competition, species response to the environment, ecological networks)
  • B. Tóthmérész, HUN (biodiversity, soil zoology, spatial models, macroecology, ecological modeling)
  • S. Wollrab, GER (aquatic ecology, food web dynamics, plankton ecology, predator-prey interactions)

 

Advisory Board

  • S. Bartha, HUN
  • S.L. Collins, USA
  • T. Czárán, HUN
  • E. Feoli, ITA
  • N. Kenkel, CAN
  • J. Lepš, CZE
  • S. Mazzoleni, ITA
  • Cs. Moskát, HUN
  • B. Oborny, HUN
  • M.W. Palmer, USA
  • G.P. Patil, USA
  • V. de Patta Pillar, BRA
  • C. Ricotta, ITA
  • Á. Szentesi, HUN

PODANI, JÁNOS
E-mail: podani@ludens.elte.hu


JORDÁN, FERENC
E-mail: jordan.ferenc@gmail.com

Indexing and Abstracting Services:

  • Biological Abstracts
  • BIOSIS Previews
  • CAB Abstracts
  • Biology & Environmental Sciences
  • Elsevier/Geo Abstracts
  • Science Citation Index Expanded
  • SCOPUS
  • Zoological Abstracts

 

 

Community Ecology
Language English
Size A4
Year of
Foundation
2000
Volumes
per Year
1
Issues
per Year
2
Founder Akadémiai Kiadó
Founder's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245
Publisher Akadémiai Kiadó
Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Publisher's
Address
H-1117 Budapest, Hungary 1516 Budapest, PO Box 245.
CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland Gewerbestrasse 11.
Responsible
Publisher
Chief Executive Officer, Akadémiai Kiadó
ISSN 1585-8553 (Print)
ISSN 1588-2756 (Online)