Authors:
H. FrickmannFachbereich Tropenmedizin am Bernhard-Nocht Institut, Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
Institut für Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene, Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Rostock, Germany

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A. PodbielskiInstitut für Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene, Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Rostock, Germany

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A. EssigInstitut für Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene, Universitätsmedizin Ulm, Ulm, Germany

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N. G. SchwarzAG Infektionsepidemiologie, Bernhard-Nocht Institut für Tropenmedizin Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

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Andreas Erich ZautnerInstitut für Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene, Universitätsmedizin Rostock, Rostock, Germany
Institut für Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene, Universitätsmedizin Ulm, Ulm, Germany
Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen, Kreuzbergring 57, D-37075, Göttingen, Germany

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Abstract

Diagnostic misidentifications of commensalic Haemophilus haemolyticus as pathogenic Haemophilus influenzae are frequent. This pilot study evaluates whether isolations of H. haemolyticus are frequent enough in Germany to cause a relevant diagnostic problem, considering the fact that even H. influenzae is a mere colonizer in about 30% of isolations.

In microbiological laboratories of two hospitals located in Northern and Southern Germany, the distribution of Haemophilus spp. was analyzed during a six-month-period. Site of infection, sex, and age of the patients was taken into consideration.

A total of 77 Haemophilus spp. isolates was acquired and discriminated on species level, comprising: 48 H. influenzae, 25 Haemophilus parainfluenzae, 3 H. haemolyticus, and 1 Haemophilus parahaemolyticus. The proportion of H. haemolyticus was calculated to range between 1.2% and 16.2 % within the 95% confidence limits. Commensalic Haemophilus spp. were isolated from oropharynx-associated sites only. H. influenzae, in contrast, was detected in clinically relevant materials like lower respiratory materials and conjunctiva swabs.

Altogether, there was a low proportion of clinical H. haemolyticus isolates. Accordingly, the problem of unnecessary antibiotic therapies due to misidentifications of H. haemolyticus as H. influenzae is quantitatively negligible compared with the risk of confusing H. influenzae colonizations with infections.

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Senior editors

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Dunay, Ildiko Rita

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Heimesaat, Markus M.

Vice Editor(s)-in-Chief: Fuchs, Anja

Editorial Board

Chair of the Editorial Board:
Jeffrey S. Buguliskis (Thomas Jefferson University, USA)

  • Jörn Albring (University of Münster, Germany)
  • Stefan Bereswill (Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Germany)
  • Dunja Bruder (University of Megdeburg, Germany)
  • Jan Buer (University of Duisburg, Germany)
  • Jeff Buguliskis (Thomas Jefferson University, USA)
  • Edit Buzas (Semmelweis University, Hungary)
  • Charles Collyer (University of Sydney, Australia)
  • Renato Damatta (UENF, Brazil)
  • Ivelina Damjanova (Semmelweis University, Hungary)
  • Maria Deli (Biological Research Center, HAS, Hungary)
  • Olgica Djurković-Djaković (University of Belgrade, Serbia)
  • Jean-Dennis Docquier (University of Siena, Italy)
  • Anna Erdei (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)
  • Zsuzsanna Fabry (University of Washington, USA)
  • Beniam Ghebremedhin (Witten/Herdecke University, Germany)
  • Nancy Guillen (Institute Pasteur, France)
  • Georgina L. Hold (University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom)
  • Ralf Ignatius (Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Germany)
  • Zsuzsanna Izsvak (MDC-Berlin, Germany)
  • Achim Kaasch (University of Cologne, Germany)
  • Tamás Laskay (University of Lübeck, Germany)
  • Oliver Liesenfeld (Roche, USA)
  • Shreemanta Parida (Vaccine Grand Challenge Program, India)
  • Matyas Sandor (University of Wisconsin, USA)
  • Ulrich Steinhoff (University of Marburg, Germany)
  • Michal Toborek (University of Miami, USA)
  • Mary Jo Wick (University of Gothenburg, Sweden)
  • Susanne A. Wolf (MDC-Berlin, Germany)

 

Dr. Dunay, Ildiko Rita
Magdeburg, Germany
E-mail: ildikodunay@gmail.com

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Language English
Size A4
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2011
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