View More View Less
  • 1 Corvinus University of Budapest
  • 2 Corvinus University of Budapest
  • 3 Corvinus University of Budapest
Restricted access

The paper examines the motivational drivers behind the participation of Hungarian consumers on a special shopping event, also known as Glamour Days. The study encompasses a variety of related conceptualizations such as hedonic/utilitarian shopping values, self-gifting as well as impulsive buying practices. After the introduction of relevant consumer behaviour concepts and theoretical frameworks, the paper presents a qualitative research on adult and adolescent female consumers’ shopping experiences during Glamour Days. By building on phenomenological methodology, this study also portrays the ways this shopping event has changed consumer society within an originally strongly utilitarian attitude driven Hungarian culture. The phenomenological interview results highlight differences within the motivational drivers of pleasure-oriented shopping for the two age groups. For teenagers, the main motivation was related to the utilitarian aspect due to their financial dependence and the special opportunity to stand out of their peer group by joining an event that is exclusively held for adult women. On the other hand, adult women are motivated by combined hedonic and utilitarian values manifested in self-gifting and impulse buying within an effectively planned and managed shopping trip. Based on the results, retail specific strategies are provided along with future research directions.

  • Alba, J. W.Williams, E. F. (2013): Pleasure Principles: A Review of Research on Hedonic Consumption. Journal of Consumer Psychology 23(1): 218.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Arnold, M. J.Reynolds, K. E. (2012): Approach and Avoidance Motivation: Investigating Hedonic Consumption in a Retail Setting. Journal of Retailing 88(3): 399411.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Babin, B. J.Darden, W. R.Griffin, M. (1994): Work and/or Fun: Measuring Hedonic and Utilitarian Shopping Value. Journal of Consumer Research 20(4): 644656.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bashar, A.Ahmad, I.Wasiq, M. (2013): A Study of Influence of Demographic Factors on Consumer Impulse Buying Behavior. Journal of ManagementResearch 13(3): 145154.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bauer, A.Mitev, A. (2012): The Effect of Attitude Toward Money on Financial Trouble and Compulsive Buying: Studying Hungarian Consumers in Debt During the Financial Crisis. In: Diamantopoulos, A.Fritz, W.Hildenbrandt, L. (Eds.): Quantitative Marketing and Marketing Management-Marketing Models and Methods in Theory and Practice. London: Springer-Verlag.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bayley, G.Nancarrow, C. (1998): Impulse Purchasing: A Qualitative Exploration of the Phenomenon. Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal 1(2): 99114.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Belk, R. (1987): A Child’s Christmas in America: Santa Claus as Deity, Consumption as Religion. Journal of American Culture 10(1): 87100.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Brici, N.Hodkinson, C.Sullivan-Mort, G. (2013): Conceptual Differences between Adolescent and Adult Impulse Buyers. Young Consumers 14(3): 258279.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Boyd, C. O. (2001): Phenomenology the Method. In: Munhall, P. L. (ed.): Nursing research: A Qualitative Perspective. Sudbury: Jones and Bartlett.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Carpenter, J. M.Moore, M. (2009): Utilitarian and Hedonic Shopping Value in the USDiscount Sector. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services 16(1): 6874.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chitturi, R.Raghunathan, R.Mahajan, V. (2008): Delight by Design: The Role of Hedonic Versus Utilitarian Benefits. Journal of Marketing 72(3): 4863.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Clarke, P. D.Mortimer, G. (2013): Self-Gifting Guilt: An Examination of Self-Gifting Motivations and Post Purchase Regret. Journal of Consumer Marketing 30(6): 472483.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Colaizzi, P. (1978): Psychological Research as a Phenomenologist Views It. In: Valle, R.King, M. (eds.): Existential Phenomenological Alternatives for Psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Coulter, R.Price, L.Feick, L. (2003): Rethinking the Origins of Involvement and Brand Commitment: Insights from Postsocialist Central Europe. Journal of Consumer Research 30(2): 151169.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Coulter, R.Price, L. – Feick L. – Micu, C. (2005): The Evolution of Consumer Knowledge and Sources of Information: Hungary in Transition. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science 33(4): 604609.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Creswell, J. W. (1998): Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing among Five Traditions. Thousand Oak: Sage.

  • Dhar, R.Wertenbroch, K. (2000): Consumer Choice Between Hedonic and Utilitarian Goods. Journal of Marketing Research 37(1): 6071.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Droge, C.Mackoy, R. D. (1995): The Consumption Culture versus Environmentalism: Bridging Value Systems with Environmental Marketing. In: Ellen, P.S.Kaufman, P. (eds.) Proceedings of the 1995 Marketing and Public Policy Conference. Atlanta: Georgia State University Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Eroglu, S.Harrell, G. D. (1986): Retail Crowding: Theoretical and Strategic Implications. Journal of Retailing 62(4): 346363.

  • Fischer, E.Arnold, S. J. (1990): More than a Labor of Love: Gender Roles and Christmas Shopping. Journal of Consumer Research 17(3): 333345.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Goldsmith, K.Cho, E. K.Dhar, R. (2012): When Guilt Begets Pleasure: The Positive Effect of a Negative Emotion. Journal of Marketing Research 49(6): 871882.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Heath, M. T.Tynan, C.Ennew, C. T. (2011): Self-Gift Giving: Understanding Consumers and Exploring Brand Messages. Journal of Marketing Communications 17(2): 127144.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hirschman, E. C.Holbrook, M. B. (1982): Hedonic Consumption: Emerging Concepts, Methods and Propositions. Journal of Marketing 46(3): 92101.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Holman, R. H. (1981): Apparel as Communication, in Symbolic Consumer Behavior. In: Hirschman, E. C.Holbrook, M. B. (eds.): Symbolic Consumer Research. Ann Arbor: Association for Consumer Research.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Huffman, C.Ratneshwar, S.Mick, D. G. (2000): Consumer Goal Structures and Goal-Determination Processes: An Integrative Framework. In: Ratneshwar, S.Mick, D.G.Huffman, C. (eds.): The Why of Consumption: Contemporary Perspectives on Consumer Motives, Goals, and Desires. London: Routledge.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hycner, R. H. (1999): Some Guidelines for the Phenomenological Analysis of Interview Data. In: Bryman, A.Burgess, R.G. (eds.): Qualitative Research. London: Sage.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kauppinen-Räisänen, H.Finne, Å.Gummerus, J.Helkkula, A.Koskull, C.Kowalkowski, C.Rindell, A. (2014): Am I Worth it? Gifting Myself with Luxury. Journal of Fashion Marketing & Management 18(2): 112132.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Leigh, J. H.Gabel, T. G. (1992): Symbolic Interactionism: Its Effects on Consumer Behaviour and Implications for Marketing Strategy. Journal of Consumer Marketing 6(3): 2738.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mick, D. G.DeMoss, M. (1990): Self Gifts: Phenomenological Insights from Four Contexts. Journal of Consumer Research 17(3): 322332.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Mick, D. G.DeMoss, M.Faber, R. J. (1992): A Projective Study of Motivations and Meanings of Self-Gifts: Implications for Retail Management. Journal of Retailing 68(2): 122144.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Millan E. S. Howard E. (2007): Shopping for Pleasure? Shopping Experiences of Hungarian Consumers. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management 35(6): 474487.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Neuner, M.Raab, G.Reisch, L. A. (2005): Compulsive Buying in Maturing Consumer Societies: An Empirical Re-Inquiry. Journal of Economic Psychology 26(4): 509522.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rohatyn, D. (1990): The (mis)Information Society: An Analysis of the Role of Propaganda in Shaping Consciousness. Bulletin of Science: Technology and Society 10(2): 7785.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rook, D. W. (1987): The Buying Impulse. Journal of Consumer Research 14(2): 18999.

  • Rook, D. W.Hoch, S. J. (1985): Consuming Impulses. In: Hirschman, E.C.Holbrook, M.B. (eds.). Advances in Consumer Research. Provo: Association for Consumer Research.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sherry, J. F. (1983): Gift Giving in Anthropological Perspectiwe. Journal of Consumer Research 10(2): 157168.

  • Sherry, J. F. (1990): A Sociocultural Analysis of a Midwestern Flea Market. Journal of Consumer Research 17(1): 1330.

  • Sivadas, E.Venkatesh, R. (1995): An Examination of Individual and Object-Specific Influences on the Extended Self and its Relation to Attachment and Satisfaction. Advances in Consumer Research 22(1): 406412.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Solomon, M. R. (1983): The Role of Products as Social Stimuli: A Symbolic Interaction Perspective. Journal of Consumer Research 10(3): 319329.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Spiegelberg, E. (1981): The Phenomenological Movement: A Historical Introduction. London: Springer.

  • Tauber, E. M. (1972): Why do People Shop? Journal of Marketing 36(4): 4649.

  • Thompson, C. J. (1996): Caring Consumers: Gendered Consumption Meanings and the Juggling Lifestyle. Journal of Consumer Research 22(4): 388407.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Thompson, C. J.Locander, W. B.Pollio, H. R. (1990): The Lived Meaning of Free Choice: An Existentialphenomenological Description of Everyday Consumer Experiences of Contemporary Married Women. Journal of Consumer Research 17(3): 346362.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wagner, T.Rudolph, T. (2010): Towards a Hierarchical Theory of Shopping Motivation. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services 17(5): 415429.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wakefield, K. L.Baker, J. (1998): Excitement at the Mall: Determinants and Effects on Shopping Response. Journal of Retailing 74(4): 515539.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ward, C.Thuhang, T. (2012): Consumer Gifting Behaviors: One for You, One for Me? Services Marketing Quarterly 29(2): 117.

  • Woodruffe-Burton, H.Wakenshaw, S. (2011): Revisiting Experiential Values of Shopping: Consumers’ Self and Identity. Marketing Intelligence & Planning 29(1): 6985.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Zhong, J. Y.Mitchell, V. W. (2012): Does Consumer Well-Being Affect Hedonic Consumption? Psychology & Marketing 29(8): 583594.