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S Farzampour Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

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A Majdi Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

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S Sadigh-Eteghad Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

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Recently, insulin has been used as a pro-cognitive agent for the potential treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), because of its ability to cross the brain–blood barrier (BBB) by a saturable transport system. This study has been designed to evaluate the effects of intranasal insulin regimen, as a bypass system of BBB, on spatial memory in amyloid-beta (Aβ) model of AD in rat. Unilateral infusion of Aβ25–35 (10 nmol/2 µl/rat) into the lateral ventricular region of brain was used to produce a rat model of AD. After a 24-h recovery period, rats received insulin or vehicle via intraperitoneal or intranasal route (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 IU) for 14 days. Memory function in rats was assessed by Morris water maze test, with 5 days of training and consequent probe test protocol. Different doses of intraperitoneal insulin did not have a significant effect on learning and memory in AD rats. However, intranasal insulin at doses of 0.2 and 0.3 IU improved the learning and memory in Aβ-received rats. In conclusion, intranasal insulin as a non-invasive strategy improves spatial learning and memory in AD model.

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Editor-in-Chief

László ROSIVALL (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Managing Editor

Anna BERHIDI (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

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  • Ákos KOLLER (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Zsolt RADÁK (University of Physical Education, Budapest, Hungary)
  • László LÉNÁRD (University of Pécs, Hungary)
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Hungarian Editorial Board

  • György BENEDEK (University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • Zoltán BENYÓ (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Mihály BOROS (University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • László CSERNOCH (University of Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Magdolna DANK (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • László DÉTÁRI (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Zoltán GIRICZ (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary and Pharmahungary Group, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Zoltán HANTOS (Semmelweis University, Budapest and University of Szeged, Hungary)
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  • László HUNYADI (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
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  • Gyula PAPP (University of Szeged, Hungary)
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  • Zoltán SZELÉNYI (University of Pécs, Hungary)
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  • Gyula TELEGDY (MTA-SZTE, Neuroscience Research Group and University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • József TOLDI (MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group and University of Szeged, Hungary)
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  • Massoud MAHMOUDIAN (Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran)
  • Tadaaki MANO (Gifu University of Medical Science, Japan)
  • Luis Gabriel NAVAR (Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, USA)
  • Hitoo NISHINO (Nagoya City University, Japan)
  • Ole H. PETERSEN (Cardiff University, UK)
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2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
335
Journal Impact Factor 1.4
Rank by Impact Factor

Physiology (Q4)

Impact Factor
without
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1.4
5 Year
Impact Factor
1.6
Journal Citation Indicator 0.42
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Physiology (Q4)

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
33
Scimago
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0.362
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Physiology (medical) (Q3)
Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
2.8
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Physiology 68/102 (33rd PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
0.508

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
330
Journal Impact Factor 1,697
Rank by Impact Factor

Physiology 73/81

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
1,697
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,806
Journal Citation Indicator 0,47
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Physiology 69/86

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
31
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,32
Scimago Quartile Score Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Physiology (medical) (Q3)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
2,7
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Physiology (medical) 69/101 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,591

 

2020  
Total Cites 245
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
2,090
Rank by Physiology 62/81 (Q4)
Impact Factor  
Impact Factor 1,866
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 1,703
Impact Factor
Journal  0,51
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Physiology 67/84 (Q4)
Citation Indicator   
Citable 42
Items
Total 42
Articles
Total 0
Reviews
Scimago 29
H-index
Scimago 0,417
Journal Rank
Scimago Physiology (medical) Q3
Quartile Score  
Scopus 270/1140=1,9
Scite Score  
Scopus Physiology (medical) 71/98 (Q3)
Scite Score Rank  
Scopus 0,528
SNIP  
Days from  172
submission  
to acceptance  
Days from  106
acceptance  
to publication  

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
137
Impact Factor 1,410
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
1,361
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,221
Immediacy
Index
0,294
Citable
Items
34
Total
Articles
33
Total
Reviews
1
Cited
Half-Life
2,1
Citing
Half-Life
9,3
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00028
Article Influence
Score
0,215
% Articles
in
Citable Items
97,06
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,03445
Average
IF
Percentile
12,963
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,267
Scopus
Scite Score
235/157=1,5
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Physiology (medical) 73/99 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,38

 

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Physiology International
Language English
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2006 (1950)
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per Year
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per Year
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