Authors:
W-C Chen Center for General Education, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan
Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan

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C-M Wu Department of Leisure and Sports Management, Cheng Shiu University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

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Z-Y Cai Division of Physical and Health Education, Center for General Education, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

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This study aimed to investigate the effects of single local vibration (LV) with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle activity and hormonal responses. A total of 12 physically inactive males were exposed to 10 sets of intermittent LV (35–40 Hz) on unilateral mid-quadriceps in the supine lying position and LV + BFR (inflated to 140 mmHg) sessions in a repeated-measures randomized crossover design, with a 1-week interval separating the sessions. The results indicated that the electromyography values from the rectus femoris during LV + BFR were greater than those during LV (p < 0.05). LV + BFR caused a minor increase in the lactate (LA) response (p < 0.05); LV with or without BFR failed to elicit change in growth hormone (GH) and testosterone (T) levels (p > 0.05). Cortisol (C) levels were decreased postexercise in both the sessions (p < 0.05). In conclusion, BFR elicited higher increase in muscle activity and metabolic response, but it did not induce hormonal responses. The exposure of LV and LV + BFR may only have a relief effect as detected by the reduction in C levels, probably because the LV did not elicit sufficient stimulus to the muscles.

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Editor-in-Chief

László ROSIVALL (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

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Anna BERHIDI (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

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  • Zsolt RADÁK (University of Physical Education, Budapest, Hungary)
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Hungarian Editorial Board

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  • Zoltán BENYÓ (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
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  • Gyula PAPP (University of Szeged, Hungary)
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2022  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
335
Journal Impact Factor 1.4
Rank by Impact Factor

Physiology (Q4)

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
1.4
5 Year
Impact Factor
1.6
Journal Citation Indicator 0.42
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Physiology (Q4)

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Scimago
H-index
33
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Journal Rank
0.362
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Physiology (medical) (Q3)
Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)

Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
2.8
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Physiology 68/102 (33rd PCTL)
Scopus
SNIP
0.508

2021  
Web of Science  
Total Cites
WoS
330
Journal Impact Factor 1,697
Rank by Impact Factor

Physiology 73/81

Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
1,697
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,806
Journal Citation Indicator 0,47
Rank by Journal Citation Indicator

Physiology 69/86

Scimago  
Scimago
H-index
31
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,32
Scimago Quartile Score Medicine (miscellaneous) (Q3)
Physiology (medical) (Q3)
Scopus  
Scopus
Cite Score
2,7
Scopus
CIte Score Rank
Physiology (medical) 69/101 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,591

 

2020  
Total Cites 245
WoS
Journal
Impact Factor
2,090
Rank by Physiology 62/81 (Q4)
Impact Factor  
Impact Factor 1,866
without
Journal Self Cites
5 Year 1,703
Impact Factor
Journal  0,51
Citation Indicator  
Rank by Journal  Physiology 67/84 (Q4)
Citation Indicator   
Citable 42
Items
Total 42
Articles
Total 0
Reviews
Scimago 29
H-index
Scimago 0,417
Journal Rank
Scimago Physiology (medical) Q3
Quartile Score  
Scopus 270/1140=1,9
Scite Score  
Scopus Physiology (medical) 71/98 (Q3)
Scite Score Rank  
Scopus 0,528
SNIP  
Days from  172
submission  
to acceptance  
Days from  106
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to publication  

2019  
Total Cites
WoS
137
Impact Factor 1,410
Impact Factor
without
Journal Self Cites
1,361
5 Year
Impact Factor
1,221
Immediacy
Index
0,294
Citable
Items
34
Total
Articles
33
Total
Reviews
1
Cited
Half-Life
2,1
Citing
Half-Life
9,3
Eigenfactor
Score
0,00028
Article Influence
Score
0,215
% Articles
in
Citable Items
97,06
Normalized
Eigenfactor
0,03445
Average
IF
Percentile
12,963
Scimago
H-index
27
Scimago
Journal Rank
0,267
Scopus
Scite Score
235/157=1,5
Scopus
Scite Score Rank
Physiology (medical) 73/99 (Q3)
Scopus
SNIP
0,38

 

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