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  • 1 Juntendo University, Japan
  • | 2 National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, Japan
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The benefit of body weight resistance exercise with slow movement (BWRE-slow) for muscle function is well-documented, but not for energy metabolism. We aimed to examine physiological responses [e.g., energy expenditure (EE), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and blood lactate (La)] during and after BWRE-slow compared to EE-matched treadmill walking (TW). Eight healthy young men (23.4 ± 1.8 years old, 171.2 ± 6.2 cm, 63.0 ± 4.8 kg) performed squat, push-up, lunge, heel-raise, hip-lift, and crunch exercises with BWRE-slow modality. Both the concentric and eccentric phases were set to 3 s. A total of three sets (10 repetitions) with 30 s rest between sets were performed for each exercise (26.5 min). On another day, subjects walked on a treadmill for 26.5 min during which EE during exercise was matched to that of BWRE-slow with the researcher controlling the treadmill speed manually. The time course changes of EE and RER were measured. The EE during exercise for BWRE-slow (92.6 ± 16.0 kcal for 26.5 min) was not significantly different from the EE during exercise for TW (95.5 ± 14.1 kcal, p = 0.36). BWRE-slow elicited greater recovery EE (40.55 ± 3.88 kcal for 30 min) than TW (37.61 ± 3.19 kcal, p = 0.029). RER was significantly higher in BWRE-slow during and 0–5 min after exercise, but became significantly lower during 25–30 min after exercise, suggesting greater lipid oxidation was induced about 30 min after exercise in BWRE-slow compared to TW. We also indicated that BWRE-slow has 3.1 metabolic equivalents in average, which is categorized as moderate-intensity physical activity.

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2020  
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Journal
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