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  • 1 Department of Exercise Science and Physical Education, , Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, , USA
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Abstract

Sodium induced volume loading may alter pressor responses to physical stress, an early symptom of cardiovascular disease. Purpose: Study 1: Determine the time point where total blood volume and serum sodium were elevated following saline consumption. Study 2: Examine the BP response to isometric handgrip (HG) and the cold pressor test (CPT) following saline consumption. Methods: Study 1: Eight participants drank 423 mL of normal saline (sodium 154 mmol/L) and had blood draws every 30 min for 3 h. Study 2: Sixteen participants underwent two randomized data collection visits; a control and experimental visit 90 min following saline consumption. Participants underwent 2 min of isometric HG, post exercise ischemia (PEI), and CPT. Results: Study 1: Total blood volume (3.8 ± 3.0 Δ%) and serum sodium (3.5 ± 3.6 Δ%) were elevated (P < 0.05) by the 90 min time point. Study 2: There were no differences in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during HG (EXP: 17.4 ± 8.2 ΔmmHg; CON: 19.1 ± 6.0 ΔmmHg), PEI (EXP: 16.9 ± 11.7 ΔmmHg; CON: 16.9 ± 7.8 ΔmmHg), or the CPT (EXP: 20.3 ± 10.8 ΔmmHg; CON: 20.9 ± 11.7 ΔmmHg) between conditions (P > 0.05). MAP recovery from the CPT was slower following saline consumption (1 min recovery: EXP; 15.7 ± 7.9 ΔmmHg, CON; 12.3 ± 8.9 ΔmmHg, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Data showed no difference in cardiovascular responses during HG or the CPT between conditions. BP recovery was delayed by saline consumption following the CPT.

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Editor-in-Chief

László ROSIVALL (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

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Anna BERHIDI (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

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  • Ákos KOLLER (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Zsolt RADÁK (University of Physical Education, Budapest, Hungary)
  • László LÉNÁRD (University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Zoltán UNGVÁRI (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

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  • László DÉTÁRI (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Zoltán GIRICZ (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary and Pharmahungary Group, Szeged, Hungary)
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  • Gábor JANCSÓ (University of Pécs, Hungary)
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  • Gyula PAPP (University of Szeged, Hungary)
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2020  
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Journal
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Scopus
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