Authors:
Emilio Romero-Romero Programa de Maestría en Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Panamá, Panamá, Panamá

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Estela Guerreo De León Centro de Investigaciones Psicofarmacológicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Panamá, Panamá, Panamá

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Juan Morán-Pinzón Centro de Investigaciones Psicofarmacológicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Panamá, Panamá, Panamá

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Rigoberto Salado-Castillo Área de Psicofisiología, Fisiología y Neuropsicología, Facultad de Psicología Universidad de Panamá, Panamá, Panamá

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Armando Castillo-Pimentel Centro de Neurociencias, Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Servicios de Alta Tecnología (INDICASAT AIP), Panamá, Panamá

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https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3500-7101
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Abstract

Introduction

Although a large part of the population may be exposed to various pressures that can lead to mental or eating problems and increased perceived stress, the transition from adolescence to adulthood has been shown to be a crucial stage. Medical students are particularly vulnerable during the transition period as they must adapt to new circumstances, which may contribute to increased perceived stress. Cortisol plays an important role between stress, weight gain, and the development of obesity. We designed a study to investigate the association between stress, eating behaviour, cortisol, and body weight in a sample of first-year medical students.

Methods

We determined 75 first-year medical students' hair and salivary cortisol concentrations by ELISA and related it to self-reported stress, eating behaviour, and anthropometric measurements throughout the academic period. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in females was 25% and 10%, and in males was 35% and 6%, respectively. We report an increase in hair cortisol, higher self-reported stress scores, and BMI mainly in females. Finally, we found evidence of positive associations between hair cortisol and BMI in females (r = 0.348) and males (r = 0.423).

Conclusion

There is a low association between short-term single-point cortisol measures and long-term cortisol, mainly in males. Hence, short-term cortisol reactivity is moderately associated with long-term cortisol reactivity when both are evaluated simultaneously. These results support the previous evidence of positive associations between cortisol with body fat percentage and BMI, and finally, that eating behaviours are modified by academic stress perception, mainly in females.

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Editor-in-Chief

László ROSIVALL (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

Managing Editor

Anna BERHIDI (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)

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  • Ákos KOLLER (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Zsolt RADÁK (University of Physical Education, Budapest, Hungary)
  • László LÉNÁRD (University of Pécs, Hungary)
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  • Zsuzsanna MIKLÓS (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
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Hungarian Editorial Board

  • György BENEDEK (University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • Zoltán BENYÓ (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Mihály BOROS (University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • László CSERNOCH (University of Debrecen, Hungary)
  • Magdolna DANK (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • László DÉTÁRI (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Zoltán GIRICZ (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary and Pharmahungary Group, Szeged, Hungary)
  • Zoltán HANTOS (Semmelweis University, Budapest and University of Szeged, Hungary)
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  • Gyula PAPP (University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • Gábor PAVLIK (University of Physical Education, Budapest, Hungary)
  • András SPÄT (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • Gyula SZABÓ (University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • Zoltán SZELÉNYI (University of Pécs, Hungary)
  • Lajos SZOLLÁR (Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary)
  • József TOLDI (MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group and University of Szeged, Hungary)
  • Árpád TÓSAKI (University of Debrecen, Hungary)

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  • Christopher H.  FRY (University of Bristol, UK)
  • Stephen E. GREENWALD (Blizard Institute, Barts and Queen Mary University of London, UK)
  • Tibor HORTOBÁGYI (University of Groningen, Netherlands)
  • George KUNOS (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA)
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  • Tadaaki MANO (Gifu University of Medical Science, Japan)
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  • Ulrich POHL (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research and Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Planegg, Germany)
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Physiology International
Language English
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